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Nantucket sleigh ride

An instance of a whaling ship that has hooked a whale and thus is being pulled by it. We're going on a Nantucket sleigh ride today, boys—I can feel it! There's a whale out there just waiting for our harpoons!
See also: ride, sleigh

take (one) for a sleigh ride

To con, swindle, mislead, or deceive someone. That get-rich-quick guru took tens of thousands of people for a sleigh ride, lining his own pockets with their investments. I can't believe I let the salesman take me for a sleigh ride like that.
See also: ride, sleigh, take

take someone for a sleigh ride

mislead someone.
A sleigh ride here is an implausible or false story or a hoax: if you take someone for a sleigh ride you mislead or cheat them. Sleigh ride can also mean ‘a drug-induced high’, so take a sleigh ride means ‘take drugs, especially cocaine’.
See also: ride, sleigh, someone, take
References in classic literature ?
The sleigh had glided for some distance along the even surface, and the gaze of the female was bent in inquisitive and, perhaps, timid glances into the recesses of the forest, when a loud and continued howling was heard, pealing under the long arches of the woods like the cry of a numerous pack of hounds.
The black drew up, with a cheerful grin upon his chilled features, and began thrashing his arms together in order to restore the circulation of his fingers, while the speaker stood erect and, throwing aside his outer covering, stepped from the sleigh upon a bank of snow which sustained his weight without yielding.
The Judge, for such being his office must in future be his title, watched with no little interest the display of this singular contention in the feelings of the youth; and, advancing, kindly took his hand, and, as he pulled him gently toward the sleigh, urged him to enter it.
Unable to resist the kind urgency of the travellers any longer, the youth, though still with an unaccountable reluctance, suffered himself to be persuaded to enter the sleigh.
The eyes of the group in the sleigh naturally preceded the movement of the rifle, and they soon discovered the object of Natty’s aim.
At each movement he made his body lowered several inches, his knees yielding with an inclination inward; but, as the sleigh turned at a bend in the road, the youth cast his eyes in quest of his old companion, and he saw that he was already nearly concealed by the trunks of the tree; while his dogs were following quietly in his footsteps, occasionally scenting the deer track, that they seemed to know instinctively was now of no further use to them.
Now the girl from the North had been lying near the lamp, eating very little and saying less for days past; but when Amoraq and Kadlu next morning packed and lashed a little hand- sleigh for Kotuko, and loaded it with his hunting-gear and as much blubber and frozen seal-meat as they could spare, she took the pulling-rope, and stepped out boldly at the boy's side.
Your house is my house," she said, as the little bone-shod sleigh squeaked and bumped behind them in the awful Arctic night.
Their voices were soon swallowed up by the cold, empty dark, and Kotuko and the girl shouldered close together as they strained on the pulling-rope or humoured the sleigh through the ice in the direction of the Polar Sea.
No European could have made five miles a day over the ice- rubbish and the sharp-edged drifts; but those two knew exactly the turn of the wrist that coaxes a sleigh round a hummock, the jerk that nearly lifts it out of an ice-crack, and the exact strength that goes to the few quiet strokes of the spear-head that make a path possible when everything looks hopeless.
He ripped a thin sliver of whalebone from the rim of a bird-snare that lay on the sleigh, and, after straightening, set it upright in a little hole in the ice, firming it down with his mitten.
They followed, tugging at the hand- sleigh, while nearer and nearer came the roaring march of the ice.
I felt myself to blame for having accepted Frome's offer, and after a short discussion I persuaded him to let me get out of the sleigh and walk along through the snow at the bay's side.
When this was done he unhooked the lantern from the sleigh, stepped out again into the night, and called to me over his shoulder: "This way.
He isn't on a box to-day," said I; "and I never knew him to go to sleep standing up behind us on a sleigh.