sleeper

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rough sleeper

Someone who sleeps outside at night (i.e., "sleeps rough"), usually because he or she has no home. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. The government's aim is to have the number of rough sleepers halved in five years' time. I spent a couple of years as a rough sleeper after my house was repossessed. It's not something I would wish on anyone.
See also: rough, sleeper

sleeper

1. n. a sleeping pill. She took a handful of sleepers with a glass of booze, and that was it.
2. n. someone or something that achieves fame after a period of invisibility. The movie “Red Willow” was undoubtedly the sleeper of the year, winning six awards.
References in classic literature ?
Such is the story of the Seven Sleepers, (with slight variations,) and I know it is true, because I have seen the cave myself.
Never a tired driver passed the wooden cross, I am sure, without wishing well to the sleeper.
If his rage had broken him into a hundred pieces every one of them would have disregarded the incident, and leapt at the sleeper.
He fathomed what it was straightaway, and immediately knew that the sleeper was in his power.
As he did it he avoided glancing at the sleeper, but not lest pity should unnerve him; merely to avoid spilling.
Werper almost forgot to breathe after the fashion of a sleeper as he saw what the ape-man was doing--he scarce repressed an ejaculation of satisfaction.
Usually a sound sleeper, the wakefulness, which had pursued him from the instant his head had touched his travelling pillow an hour or so back, was not only an uncommon occurrence, but one which seemed proof against any effort on his part to overcome it.
Behind the sleeper stands an old cask, which serves for a table.
It was hours later, in the very middle of the night, that one of God's mysterious messengers, gliding ahead of the incalculable host of his companions sweeping westward with the dawn line, pronounced the awakening word in the ear of the sleeper, who sat upright and spoke, he knew not why, a name, he knew not whose.
Taken by an adult this powder would insure several hours of heavy slumber without danger to the sleeper.
He looked about him for an offensive weapon, caught up the snuffers, and, before applying them to the cabbage-headed candle, lunged at the sleeper as though he would have run him through the body.
Fagin looked hard at the robber; and, motioning him to be silent, stooped over the bed upon the floor, and shook the sleeper to rouse him.
Fagin made no answer, but bending over the sleeper again, hauled him into a sitting posture.
From all these phases of the storm, Riderhood would turn, as if they were interruptions--rather striking interruptions possibly, but interruptions still--of his scrutiny of the sleeper.
The sleeper moving an arm, he sat down again in his chair, and feigned to watch the storm from the window.