slave to

*slave to something

Fig. someone who is under the control of something; someone whose time or attention is controlled or "owned by" by something. (Fig. on being a slave to a person. *Typically: be ~; become ~.) Mary is a slave to her job. Bill is a slave to his drug addiction.
See also: slave
References in classic literature ?
Any one attempting to harm "young Mistress" or "old Mistress" during the night would have had to cross the dead body of the slave to do so.
picture to yourself the chance, ever hanging over you, of your wife and your little children -- those objects which nature urges even the slave to call his own -- being torn from you and sold like beasts to the first bidder
Five minutes later the merchant was leading his slave to the public market, where a great concourse of people filled the great open space in the centre of which stood the slave block.
What business had his slave to be marching round the country, inventing machines, and holding up his head among gentlemen?
From Slave to Superstar of the Wild West: The Awesome Story of Jim Beckwourth is the incredible true-life story of a biracial ex-slave turned American mountain man who lived over 200 years ago.
William and Ellen were illiterate, because it was illegal for anyone to teach a slave to read.
7) First, by tying Henry's physical condition to the grapevines -- the body of the slave to the product of his la bor-the narrator symbolically portrays the dehumanization that slavery entailed.
What irks me, you know this, is that I am and forever shall be a slave to that which brought (said: 'brung') me here.
There the master, because Frederick paid him a fixed weekly wage, allowed his slave to make his own work arrangements.
According to his biographer Ellen Tarry, author of The Other Toussaint, he was fortunate as a slave to know his mother and father and to be instructed in the Catholic faith and receive baptism and the other sacraments of the Church.
37) One way to evade the anti- manumission law was to depend on a trustworthy friend to permit the slave to live as free.
His transition in The Interesting Narrative was not just from slave to freedman, but also from member of a society secure in its slaveholding and slave trading to member of one stretching toward freedom for all.
He was the "first American slave to protest his bondage in verse; the first African American to publish a book in the South; the only slave to earn a significant income by selling his poems; the only poet of any race to produce a book of poems before he could write; and the only slave to publish two volumes of poetry while in bondage and another shortly after emancipation.
I am not the first to detect similarities between Gary Collison's Shadrack Minkins: From Fugitive Slave to Citizen and Peter Hinks's To Awaken My Afflicted Brethren: David Walker and the Problem of Antebellum Slave Resistance.