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like lambs to the slaughter

 and like a lamb to the slaughter
Fig. quietly and without seeming to realize the likely difficulties or dangers of a situation. Young men fighting in World War I simply went like lambs to the slaughter. Our team went on the football field like lambs to the slaughter to meet the league-leaders.
See also: lamb, like, slaughter

like pigs to the slaughter

Rur. obediently and in large numbers. (See also like lambs to the slaughter.) Look at all the people lining up to mail their tax forms on time, like pigs to the slaughter.
See also: like, pig, slaughter

like a lamb to the slaughter

something that you say about someone who does something or goes somewhere calmly and happily, not knowing that something unpleasant is going to happen to them
Usage notes: This phrase comes from the Bible. The slaughter is the time when animals are killed for their meat.
Here comes the bride, like a lamb to the slaughter.
See also: lamb, like, slaughter

like a lamb to the slaughter

Also, as lambs to the slaughter. Innocently and helplessly, without realizing the danger. For example, She agreed to appeal to the board, little knowing she would go like a lamb to the slaughter . This expression appears in several biblical books (Isaiah, Jeremiah), and the simile itself was used by Chaucer.
See also: lamb, like, slaughter


and slaughter
tv. to overwhelm; to beat someone in a sports contest. We went out on the field prepared to slaughter them. The murdered us in the second half.


See murder


mod. drunk. Garth went out and got himself slaughtered again last night.
See also: slaughter
References in periodicals archive ?
It was to clarify this unhealthy situation that the French government issued a decree acknowledging the Big Mosque of Paris as the only organisation qualified to nominate slaughterers and to control their work.
On top of this both retailers and slaughterers are anxious to establish regular supplies of domestic beef after decoupled subsidy is introduced in just under a year's time.
The NBA is ready to work with slaughterers, retailers and other farm organisations to design improved payment systems which reward the delivery of the right type of cattle.
If they do not raise their prices farmers, who are looking forward to their decoupled Single Income Payment, will very quickly say they are not in business to let slaughterers and retailers make money at their expense and will be able to exercise their option to either cut down, or give up, beef production without forcing any reduction to their entitlement income.
However, far stronger prices can be expected next autumn if the impact of the dozen big players, already established on the cow beef market, is strengthened by a fresh group of large slaughterers who feel confident about export deliveries into France and The Netherlands.
We hear some slaughterers insisting that it is the market which will decide prices.
FQAS is supported by slaughterers and processors who contribute to its funding so it is difficult to understand why they could be tempted to handle non-assured imports - unless they look like being a more profitable long-term option.
Cattle cannot be too dear if their value does not cover their cost of production, so slaughterers who feel hard done by must turn to the retailers they supply and persuade these companies to put up more money instead.
Prices paid by the slaughterers to farmers have been marginally better than a year ago, with wholesalers talking of demand from the multiples as "satisfactory".
It would be utterly counterproductive at this stage for some slaughterers to slip into the lifetime habit of trying to force down cattle prices --"
The bulk of the MLC's income is raised through levies payable by livestock producers, slaughterers and exporters.
Alnwick beef farmer and NBA chairman Duff Burrell said: "Many slaughterers are looking for a chance to knock back prices and one of their habitual ploys is to create the impression of a falling market because this can persuade finishers to rush cattle forward before they are hit with further income losses.
Slaughterers in England saw prices top 105p per kg deadweight in late May, and a further penny since then has provoked grumbling among the plant operators.
Yet the supply available to slaughterers has recovered more strongly than the auction data suggest.
They should not be persuaded by slaughterers to part with them cheaply because there is a glut of animals on the market, the National Beef Association has warned.