slang

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slanging match

A bitter argument or dispute in which each side hurls numerous insults, accusations, or verbal abuse at one another. Primarily heard in UK. At first, I thought we were just going through a rough patch in our relationship, but lately, it seems like every night Janet and I get into a slanging match with each other. It might be time to end things.
See also: match, slang

sling off at (someone)

1. To tease, mock, or ridicule someone. Primarily heard in Australia, New Zealand. Ah, don't take everything so personally, I'm only slinging off at you! It took me a while to get used to the way Sarah's family slings off at each other off all the time.
2. To criticise or upbraid someone in a harsh, insulting, and abusive manner. Primarily heard in Australia, New Zealand. I wish the boss would offer some constructive criticism instead of just slinging off at us when something goes wrong. I'm so glad the neighbours moved. Every night, the wife slung off at her husband, and it was incredibly irritating to listen to.
See also: off, sling

sit on someone or something

 
1. Lit. to place oneself in a sitting position on someone or something. The enormous woman knocked the crook out and sat on him until the police came. I need to sit on this chair for a minute and catch my breath.
2. Fig. to hold someone or something back; to delay someone or something. The project cannot be finished because the city council is sitting on the final approval. Ann deserves to be promoted, but the manager is sitting on her because of a disagreement. It's hard to do your best when you know that someone is sitting on you, and no matter what you do, it won't help your advancement.
See also: on, sit

sit on

Also, sit upon.
1. Confer about or deliberate over, as in Another attorney was called to sit on the case. [Mid-1400s]
2. Suppress or repress, as in I know they were sitting on some evidence. [Early 1900s]
3. Postpone action or resolution regarding, as in I don't know why the city council is sitting on their decision. [Early 1900s]
4. Rebuke sharply, reprimand, as in If he interrupts one more time I'm going to sit on him. [ Slang; second half of 1800s]
See also: on, sit

a ˈslanging match

(British English, informal) a noisy, angry argument: It started as a peaceful discussion, but it ended in a real slanging match.
Slanging in this idiom comes from the old verb slang, meaning ‘to attack somebody with rude and offensive language’.
See also: match, slang

sit on

v.
1. To occupy a seat as a member of some body of officials: The president of the company sits on the board of directors.
2. To confer about something: The committee will sit on the matter tomorrow and make a decision.
3. To affect someone with or as if with a burden: Our financial troubles sat heavily on my parents.
4. To suppress or repress something: The attorney suspected the prosecution of sitting on evidence that could help her client.
5. To postpone action or resolution regarding something: I'm going to sit on the proposal until I have more information. The company is sitting on $500 million in cash, and everyone is wondering what they'll do with it.
See also: on, sit

slang

tv. to sell drugs. (May be related to sling or one of the very old senses of slang.) The cops got him for slanging.
References in classic literature ?
He means all right, but he's picked up so much slang here that he's about forgotten how to talk English, and it's nigh on to four years since he's met a young lady.
I know I must talk a lot of slang an' words you don't understand.
If you are particularly lucky, you sit on the staircase, you get a tepid ice, and you hear vapid talk in slang phrases all round you.
We will rough it, Grace (to use the slang phrase), merely for a change.
When we reached our hotel and it seemed that he was about to lose the Reverend, he showed so much sorrow, and begged so hard and so earnestly that the Reverend's heart was not hard enough to hold out against the pleadings-- so he went away with the parent-honoring student, like a right Christian, and took supper with him in his lodgings, and sat in the surf-beat of his slang and profanity till near midnight, and then left him--left him pretty well talked out, but grateful "clear down to his frogs," as he expressed it.
Milesian = slang for Irish, from Milesius, mythical Spanish conqueror of Ireland; Evreux = town in Normandy, France; a D'Uzes = a member of an ancient noble family in southern France}
Some of the common slangs explained in the book are-