skid

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grease the skids

Fig. to help prepare for or ease the way for the success or failure of someone or something. Ray set out to grease the skids for the right things to happen. We need someone to grease the skids for the Wilson contract.
See also: grease, skid

hit the skids

Fig. to decline; to decrease in value or status. Jed hit the skids when he started drinking. The firm hit the skids when the dollar collapsed.
See also: hit, skid

on the skids

Sl. on the decline. My newly started business is on the skids. Her health is really on the skids, but she stays cheery anyway.
See also: on, skid

put the skids on (something)

Sl. to cause something to fail. They put the skids on the project when they refused to give us any more money. That's the end of our great idea! Somebody put the skids on.
See also: on, put, skid

put the skids under someone or something

Sl. to cause someone or something to fail. Her lateness put the skids under our presentation to the board of directors. He thought he could get promoted if he put the skids under the vice president.
See also: put, skid

skid across something

to slip or glide across something, such as ice or wet pavement. The car skidded across the pavement and crashed into a tree. Our bus skidded across the icy bridge and ran into a ditch on the other side.
See also: across, skid

skid into someone or something

to slip or glide into someone or something. The bicycle skidded into a pedestrian. The car skidded into a guard rail.
See also: skid

hit the skids

to fail His career really hit the skids after his divorce.
Usage notes: often used in the form on the skids ( failing): I can't believe that a whole industry is on the skids.
See also: hit, skid

hit the skids

 
1. (Australian informal) to leave a place quickly When his ex-girlfriend arrived at the party Ben really hit the skids.
2. (Australian informal) to make a vehicle stop very suddenly A car suddenly pulled out in front of us and Jake hit the skids.
3. (Australian informal) to get into a very bad situation, especially by losing your money, home, or job Poor old Dennis has really hit the skids since he split up with his wife.
See also: hit, skid

skid row

  (mainly American informal)
a poor area in a city where people who have no jobs and homes live in cheap rooms or sleep outdoors She works as a social worker with alcoholics on skid row. (mainly American informal)
See also: row, skid

be on the skids

  (informal)
to be having a lot of problems and be likely to fail I hear their space programme is on the skids.
See also: on, skid

put the skids under somebody/something

  (British & Australian informal)
to make something likely to fail Opposition from local residents has put the skids under plans for a new nightclub.
See hit the skids
See also: put, skid

on the skids

In the process of decline or ruin, as in If she quit now, her career would be on the skids. The skids here are runners such as those on a sled, enabling one to go downhill quickly. [c. 1920]
See also: on, skid

put the skids on

Bring to a halt, as in The school committee put the skids on the idea of a dress code. The word skid here probably refers to a shoe or drag that applies pressure to the wheel of a vehicle to prevent it from moving.
See also: on, put, skid

put the skids under

Bring about the failure or defeat of, as in It was lack of funds that put the skids under the new senior center. The skids here are runners or rollers on which a heavy object may be moved. [Colloquial; early 1900s]
See also: put, skid

skid row

A squalid district inhabited by derelicts and vagrants; also, a life of impoverished dissipation. For example, That part of town is our skid row, or His drinking was getting so bad we thought he was headed for skid row. This expression originated in the lumber industry, where it signified a road or track made of logs laid crosswise over which logs were slid. Around 1900 the name Skid Road was used for the part of a town frequented by loggers, which had many bars and brothels, and by the 1930s the variant skid row, with its current meaning, came into use.
See also: row, skid

grease the skids

tv. to help prepare for the success or failure of someone or something. (see also put the skids under someone/something.) Ray set out to grease the skids for the right things to happen.
See also: grease, skid

hit the skids

tv. to decline; to decrease in value or status; to go downhill (figuratively). Jed hit the skids when he started drinking.
See also: hit, skid

on the skids

mod. on the decline. (see also put the skids under someone/something.) Her health is really on the skids, but she stays cheery anyway.
See also: on, skid

put the skids under someone/something

tv. to cause someone or something to fail. (see also on the skids.) The mayor put the skids under my plan.
See also: put, skid

skid marks

n. unclean, brownish marks on one’s underpants. Just looking at him, you know he’s the type who has skid marks and enjoys popping zits.
See also: mark, skid

skid row

n. the name for a place populated with ruined alcoholics and other down-and-out people. Just because they’re on skid row, it doesn’t mean they’re beyond help.
See also: row, skid

skid row bum

n. a down-and-out person; a low alcoholic beggar. Do you want to end up a skid row bum?
See also: bum, row, skid

skid-lid

n. a motorcycle helmet. The law has no business telling me I gotta wear a skid-lid.

put the skids on

Slang
To bring to a halt: "Sacrificing free speech to put the skids on prurient printed matter is not the correct path, the courts said" (Curtis J. Sitomer).
See also: on, put, skid
References in periodicals archive ?
However, bunching behavior was not associated with greater volumes skidded per cycle, suggesting that skidder operators may be more influenced by the number of chokers available per turn (i.
That skidder size was not related to volume or number of trees skidded (indeed, on average, smaller skidders in this study yarded more trees per turn than larger skidders) perhaps supports other studies that have suggested that differences in the sizes of payloads has more to do with the operator's behavior and judgment than skidder size (e.