skid


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the skids

1. The framework that is attached to the side of a ship when loading or unloading cargo. The last of the boxes are on the skids now.
2. slang A period of trouble or decline. The team started the season so well, but they've really hit the skids now. I think Marissa and I are going to break-up soon, we're on the skids.
See also: skid

be on the skids

To be in jeopardy and likely to end or fail. Of course their relationship is on the skids, they fight all the time! Our project is on the skids because the committee pulled their funding.
See also: on, skid

hit the skids

To experience a period of trouble or decline. The team started the season so well, but they've really hit the skids now. I think Marissa and I are going to break-up soon—we've hit the skids.
See also: hit, skid

put the skids on (something)

To cause something to halt, cease, or fail. His criminal record has so far put the skids on every job he's applied for. The CEO quickly put the skids on the proposal for better employee benefits.
See also: on, put, skid

put the skids under (someone or something)

To cause the ruin, failure, or defeat of someone or something. Her frequent absences from work put the skids under any hopes she had of a promotion. The boss accused Theresa of trying to put the skids under him.
See also: put, skid

grease the skids

Fig. to help prepare for or ease the way for the success or failure of someone or something. Ray set out to grease the skids for the right things to happen. We need someone to grease the skids for the Wilson contract.
See also: grease, skid

hit the skids

Fig. to decline; to decrease in value or status. Jed hit the skids when he started drinking. The firm hit the skids when the dollar collapsed.
See also: hit, skid

on the skids

Sl. on the decline. My newly started business is on the skids. Her health is really on the skids, but she stays cheery anyway.
See also: on, skid

put the skids on (something)

Sl. to cause something to fail. They put the skids on the project when they refused to give us any more money. That's the end of our great idea! Somebody put the skids on.
See also: on, put, skid

put the skids under someone or something

Sl. to cause someone or something to fail. Her lateness put the skids under our presentation to the board of directors. He thought he could get promoted if he put the skids under the vice president.
See also: put, skid

skid across something

to slip or glide across something, such as ice or wet pavement. The car skidded across the pavement and crashed into a tree. Our bus skidded across the icy bridge and ran into a ditch on the other side.
See also: across, skid

skid into someone or something

to slip or glide into someone or something. The bicycle skidded into a pedestrian. The car skidded into a guard rail.
See also: skid

on the skids

In the process of decline or ruin, as in If she quit now, her career would be on the skids. The skids here are runners such as those on a sled, enabling one to go downhill quickly. [c. 1920]
See also: on, skid

put the skids on

Bring to a halt, as in The school committee put the skids on the idea of a dress code. The word skid here probably refers to a shoe or drag that applies pressure to the wheel of a vehicle to prevent it from moving.
See also: on, put, skid

put the skids under

Bring about the failure or defeat of, as in It was lack of funds that put the skids under the new senior center. The skids here are runners or rollers on which a heavy object may be moved. [Colloquial; early 1900s]
See also: put, skid

skid row

A squalid district inhabited by derelicts and vagrants; also, a life of impoverished dissipation. For example, That part of town is our skid row, or His drinking was getting so bad we thought he was headed for skid row. This expression originated in the lumber industry, where it signified a road or track made of logs laid crosswise over which logs were slid. Around 1900 the name Skid Road was used for the part of a town frequented by loggers, which had many bars and brothels, and by the 1930s the variant skid row, with its current meaning, came into use.
See also: row, skid

on skid row

mainly AMERICAN, INFORMAL
Skid row is a poor part of a city where many people who are homeless and alcoholic live. He worked for twenty years catching drug dealers on the city's skid row. Note: You say that someone is on skid row when they have lost all their money and possessions. A drug addict who lived on skid row, she fit the profile of the other missing women.
See also: on, row, skid

on the skids

INFORMAL
COMMON If something is on the skids, it is experiencing many problems and will probably fail. My marriage was on the skids. It took Donny some time to realise his career was on the skids.
See also: on, skid

put the skids under something

BRITISH, INFORMAL
If a person or thing puts the skids under something or someone, they cause them to experience many problems or fail. It was a sudden increase in the oil price which first put the skids under the world economy. The Brazilian striker's fifth-minute goal helped put the skids under Manchester United in their quarter-final in Munich last month.
See also: put, skid, something

hit the skids

begin a rapid decline or deterioration. informal
The origin of skid is uncertain, but it may be connected with the Old Norse word from which English ski is derived. It is used here and in the next two entries in the sense of a plank or roller on which a heavy object may be placed in order to move it easily.
See also: hit, skid

on the skids

(of a person or their career) in a bad state; failing. informal
1989 Thomas Berger The Changing Past Jackie arrived at middle age with a career on the skids.
See also: on, skid

put the skids under

hasten the decline or failure of. informal
See also: put, skid

hit the ˈskids

(especially American English) begin to decline or get worse very quickly: In February shares hit the skids, and in one day $1 bn was wiped off the value of the company.
See also: hit, skid

(on) skid ˈrow

(informal, especially American English) people who are on skid row live in a very poor part of town where there are many social problems: When he went bankrupt he lost everything, and ended up living on skid row for a few years. OPPOSITE: on easy streetThis expression came from the phrase skid road, referring to the poor part of towns where loggers (= people who cut down trees or cut and transported wood) lived. Originally a skid road was a road made of large pieces of wood, used for moving logs to the mill.
See also: row, skid

on the ˈskids

(informal) moving towards disaster; declining: It was clear months ago that the firm was on the skids. OPPOSITE: fly high
See also: on, skid

put the ˈskids under somebody/something

(informal) make somebody/something fail; stop somebody/something doing something: Unfortunately the government has put the skids under the hospital building programme.
See also: put, skid, somebody, something

grease the skids

tv. to help prepare for the success or failure of someone or something. (see also put the skids under someone/something.) Ray set out to grease the skids for the right things to happen.
See also: grease, skid

hit the skids

tv. to decline; to decrease in value or status; to go downhill (figuratively). Jed hit the skids when he started drinking.
See also: hit, skid

on the skids

mod. on the decline. (see also put the skids under someone/something.) Her health is really on the skids, but she stays cheery anyway.
See also: on, skid

put the skids under someone/something

tv. to cause someone or something to fail. (see also on the skids.) The mayor put the skids under my plan.
See also: put, skid, something

skid marks

n. unclean, brownish marks on one’s underpants. Just looking at him, you know he’s the type who has skid marks and enjoys popping zits.
See also: mark, skid

skid row

n. the name for a place populated with ruined alcoholics and other down-and-out people. Just because they’re on skid row, it doesn’t mean they’re beyond help.
See also: row, skid

skid row bum

n. a down-and-out person; a low alcoholic beggar. Do you want to end up a skid row bum?
See also: bum, row, skid

skid-lid

n. a motorcycle helmet. The law has no business telling me I gotta wear a skid-lid.

put the skids on

Slang
To bring to a halt: "Sacrificing free speech to put the skids on prurient printed matter is not the correct path, the courts said" (Curtis J. Sitomer).
See also: on, put, skid
References in periodicals archive ?
Overall, skid loaders are probably more predominant in recycling or demolition because of their versatility," Gehl's Moore says.
For the end that would go to the skid steer's hydraulics, he attached a coupling, which is hollow and threaded all the way through, that allows you to go from a half-inch pipe thread to an 8 JIC.
With these two systems on your car, the car will take care of a skid and you should just continue to steer in the direction you want to go.
3] utilization capacity (figure 3), but the total skid trail density (m/hec) are 14.
We do, however, utilize skid steer units to move material from bins and piles to the baling operations.
Now, there is a smooth layer of bitumen laid in different patterns so skids can happen unexpectedly and it's laid on a slight incline for water sprinklers to keep it as slimy as wet moss.
So, including the factors of E* of the rubber compound and the thickness of liquid like layer which changes depending on lowering temperature, we can propose equation (3) and equation (4) transformed from equation (2) for the factors affecting the ice skid number of BPST of the rubber compound.
Of an estimated 1,600 homeless women and children now living on Skid Row, Bales said he has about 400 at the overcrowded downtown mission, and two or three families have to share rooms.
With scores of different attachments at its disposal, the skid steer can take care of practically any task on the jobsite--and the ability for one machine to tackle a number of jobs is one of the biggest advantages of the skid-steer loader.
Demolition contractors use compact excavators and skid steers outfitted with a variety of attachments to perform "infrastructure" demolition, or the removal of plumbing and heating and electrical systems within a building.
The skid pan has already been given the thumbs-up from Fife police.
Thirty-five years ago, New Holland introduced the L35 skid steer loader--the first skid steer loader in the construction industry with ROPS and a vertical parallel lift boom system," said Terry Sheehan, vice president, New Holland Construction.
For decades, Skid Row has been a dumping ground and has been a very bad regional solution to the problem of homelessness.
Nearly every recycling company uses skid steers and/or forklifts in some aspects of its operation.
a Canadian maker of skid steer loaders and other industrial and agricultural material handling equipment.