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sing off the same songsheet

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing off the same songsheet before we begin. Make sure everyone on the campaign is singing off the same songsheet before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: off, same, sing, songsheet

sing off the same songbook

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing off the same songbook before we begin. Make sure everyone on the campaign is singing off the same songbook before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: off, same, sing, songbook

sing off the same hymn sheet

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing off the same hymn sheet before we begin. Make sure everyone on the campaign is singing off the same hymn sheet before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: hymn, off, same, sheet, sing

sing off the same hymnbook

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing off the same hymnbook before we begin. Make sure everyone on the campaign is singing off the same hymnbook before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: hymnbook, off, same, sing

sing from the same songsheet

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing from the same songsheet before we begin. Make sure everyone from the campaign is singing from the same songsheet before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: same, sing, songsheet

sing from the same songbook

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing from the same songbook before we begin. Make sure everyone from the campaign is singing from the same songbook before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: same, sing, songbook

sing from the same hymn sheet

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing from the same hymn sheet before we begin. Make sure everyone from the campaign is singing from the same hymn sheet before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: hymn, same, sheet, sing

sing from the same hymnbook

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing from the same hymnbook before we begin. Make sure everyone from the campaign is singing from the same hymnbook before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: hymnbook, same, sing

sing like a canary

To inform against someone to the police or other authority about his or her criminal or illicit behavior. I heard Joey Malone has been singing like a canary in the hopes of getting his sentence reduced. Let's make sure he's sleeping with the fishes before he gets the chance!
See also: canary, like, sing

Church ain't out till they quit singing.

Rur. things have not yet reached the end. Charlie: No way our team can win now. Mary: Church ain't out till they quit singing. There's another inning to go.
See also: church, out, quit, singe, till

burst into something

to begin to produce a lot of something The children burst into tears when they saw their ruined toys. The car burst into flames. The whole situation was so ridiculous, I simply burst into laughter.
Related vocabulary: break into something
See also: burst

all-singing, all-dancing

  (humorous)
very modern and technically advanced She showed us the new all-singing, all-dancing graphics software she'd bought for her computer.

burst into

1. Also, burst out in or into . Break out into sudden activity. For example, burst into flames means "break out in a fire," as in This dry woodpile may well burst into flames. A version of this term, which dates from the 16th century, was used figuratively by John Milton: "Fame is the spur ... But the fair guerdon [reward] when we hope to find, and think to burst out into sudden blaze" ( Lycidas, 1637).
2. Also, burst out. Give sudden utterance to. For example, burst into tears or laughter or song or speech or burst out crying or laughing or singing , etc. mean "begin suddenly to weep, laugh, sing," and so on, as in When she saw him, she burst into tears, or I burst out laughing when I saw their outfits, or When they brought in the cake, we all burst into song. These terms have been so used since the late 1300s.
See also: burst

burst into

v.
1. To enter some place suddenly and forcefully: The police burst into the room and conducted a raid.
2. To start doing something suddenly: Sometimes we burst into song while we're hiking in the mountains.
See also: burst

scorched

1. mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. Who wants to go out and get scorched?
2. and singed (sɪndʒd) mod. having to do with hair burned while smoking marijuana. (Collegiate.) If you go to sleep, you’ll be singed for sure.
See also: scorch

singed

verb
See also: singe
References in classic literature ?
With gentle caresses and most tender words the loving Elves gathered about the child, and, with Rose-Leaf by her side, they led her through the palace, and along green, winding paths, till Eva saw what seemed a wall of flowers rising before her, while the air was filled with the most fragrant odors, and the low, sweet music as of singing blossoms.
Do you see yonder lovely spirit singing with my sister Moonlight?
Long Eva watched their shining wings, and listened to the music of their voices as they flew singing home, and when at length the last little form had vanished among the clouds, she saw that all around her where the Elves had been, the fairest flowers had sprung up, and the lonely brook-side was a blooming garden.
Nothing but a little song I heard the hare-bells singing," replied the Fairy, and, taking her harp, sang, in a low, sweet voice:--
SOME FRIEND OF HARRIS'S (FROM THE BACK OF THE ROOM): "No, you're not, you chuckle-head, you're singing the Admiral's song from PINAFORE.
Friend finally suggests that it doesn't matter what Harris is singing so long as Harris gets on and sings it, and Harris, with an evident sense of injustice rankling inside him, requests pianist to begin again.
They said he never once suggested by his tone or manner that he was singing anything funny - that would spoil it.
He glowered round upon us with a look of such concentrated ferocity that, but for our being forewarned as to the German method of comic singing, we should have been nervous; and he threw such a wailing note of agony into the weird music that, if we had not known it was a funny song, we might have wept.
Jerry enjoyed the singing much in the same way the opium eater enjoys his dreams.
My dear," Harley said to Villa at the conclusion of one such singing, "it's fortunate for him that you are not an animal trainer, or, rather, I suppose, it would be better called 'trained animal show-woman'; for you'd be topping the bill in all the music-halls and vaudeville houses of the world.
To-night is singing night, and there's been lots of noise and no harm done--nothing but beer drunk, and nobody the worse for it, though some of them do look hot and excited.
Now THAT is singing what is," he proclaimed, when she had finished.
Since Joan, a shop manager from Brighouse, and Derek joined Sing Live Northern in January, 2004, her life has almost been taken over by the 'hobby' of singing, planning her time around the Sing Live concerts.
The first, in October, found her singing ``Ayre,'' a new folk-song cycle Osvaldo Golijov wrote for her.
Linda Marquart's book, The Right Way to Sing, is a pragmatic approach to singing that would benefit amateurs, beginning voice students and teachers, and choir directors and members.