simmer

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Related to simmered: simmered down

simmer down

 
1. Lit. to decrease in intensity. (As boiling dies down when the heat is lowered or removed.) The hectic activity of the day finally simmered down. When things simmer down in the fall, this is a much nicer place.
2. Fig. [for someone] to become calm or less agitated. I wish you would simmer down. Please simmer down, you guys!
See also: down, simmer

simmer down

Become calm after anger or excitement, as in Simmer down, Mary; I'm sure he'll make it up to you, or I haven't time to look at your report now, but I will when things have simmered down a bit . This idiom derives from simmer in the sense of "cook at low heat, below the boiling point." [Second half of 1800s]
See also: down, simmer

simmer down

v.
1. To become calm after excitement or anger: We left him to simmer down after the argument.
2. To reduce a liquid by heating it to a simmer and allowing the water to evaporate: We simmered down the chili until it was thick enough to hold a spoon upright. Return the sauce to the pan and simmer it down to a medium thickness.
See also: down, simmer

simmer (down)

1. in. to reduce one’s anger. Simmer down, you guys.
2. in. to get quiet. I waited till things began to simmer down, and then I started.
See also: down, simmer

simmer

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
Coconut milk and red curry paste are simmered together; when slightly reduced, diced potatoes, cauliflower, green beans, red bell peppers, and baby corn are added and allowed to simmer until tender.
The resulting cooking liquid is simmered, seasoned, and served as the accompanying sauce.
In a zipper lock plastic food bag, place cooled simmered ingredients and shrimp.
Braised Beef With Roasted Parsnips, Leeks and Red Peppers features beef pot roast simmered to fork-tenderness with broth, garlic and a bay leaf.
The sauce takes about 60 seconds to make and people can't believe it hasn't simmered for hours,'' wrote Altman, adding that she also has used it on meatballs and as a barbecue marinade.
Or it can be a brawny homemade broth made with simmered bones, meat scraps and vegetables (skim the fat and don't add salt).
I'm out to dispel the myth that rich-flavored, homemade-tasting soups must be simmered slowly over a long period of time.