silt up

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silt up

[for a body of water] to become filled with silt. The river moved too fast to silt up. The lake silted up in a very few years.
See also: up

silt up

v.
1. To become filled with silt: The old canal had silted up.
2. To fill, cover, or obstruct something with silt: River sediments gradually silted up the harbor. Parts of the creek were now too shallow for boats because the storm had silted it up.
See also: up
References in periodicals archive ?
There were significant polynomial relationships between total biomass or below-ground biomass and the silt + clay content in each layer.
Soil texture were categorized that including loam, silt loam, silt clay loam, clay loam and clay.
4 cm of silt accumulates in the lake per year; thus, within 20 years it may constitute 3 to 88 cm (Ciunys, Katkevicius 2008).
The company installs silt fences and offers a service contract to maintain them during the course of a project.
Although the poorly drained Ohakea silt loam is located in the lowest position of the landscape, the other soils show no relationship to landscape.
DOWN THE RIVER Scientists have monitored the flow of silt and other material to the sea in less than 10 percent of the world's rivers.
In addition, due to very low permeability of the silt, the drainage function of the stone column is practically negligible.
According to project leader Bjorn Bekken, the blades of the Hammerfest Strom turbine do not change the waterflow, so they don't impede silt or nutrient flows.
He was up to his waist in silt, but none the worse for his experience.
What is left is a mountain of mouldy and ragged sandbags, saturated with bacteria-filled sand and silt that can cause untold ecological damage to waterways, and can result in massive cleanup bills.
Eolian units apparently include both the early Wisconsinan Roxana Silt and the late Wisconsinan Peoria Loess.
Thode's channel not only threatened to undermine roads and subdivisions, but it also pumped phosphorous-rich silt into Lake Sammamish.
The Mississippi rolls because there are skeletons rocking in cypress knee chairs under the silt.