silly


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Related to silly: silly season

scare (someone) silly

To shock or frighten someone very suddenly and/or severely. (Hyperbolically alludes to frightening someone so severely as to cause them to lose their mind.) Don't sneak up on me like that, you scared me silly! That car accident seems to have scared Janet silly—she's still shaken by it.
See also: scare, silly

(you) silly goose

childish You silly, goofy person! You can't have cookies before we eat dinner, you silly goose! You'll spoil your appetite!
See also: goose, silly

silly money

An absurdly or extraordinarily large amount of money. Ever since John got into investment banking, he's been making silly money! Part of the reason so many people are in debt is that going to the college costs silly money.
See also: money, silly

ask a silly question and you get a silly answer

If one asks a strange or nonsensical question, the listener will probably respond with a similarly strange or nonsensical answer. A: "What the heck are you talking about? All I did was ask if you think I should dress my cat up for Halloween!" B: "Well, ask a silly question and you get a silly answer!"
See also: and, answer, ask, get, question, silly

bored silly

Extremely bored to the point of distraction, frustration, or irritation. I was bored silly listening to that lecture this afternoon.
See also: bore, silly

silly season

A period during which news outlets cover frivolous or less serious news stories, typically during the summer when fewer topics are generated. Primarily heard in UK. I don't even buy the paper during the silly season because there's nothing worth reading about. You know it's the silly season when your assignment is to cover the circus.
See also: season, silly

play silly buggers

To act in a foolish, irritating, or reckless manner. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. It's no wonder that we lost the game, with all of you playing silly buggers out here instead of training like professionals. I wouldn't be surprised if we end up in another war with the way the two countries' leaders have been playing silly buggers recently.
See also: bugger, play, silly

bored silly

 and bored to distraction; bored stiff; bored to death; bored to tears
very bored; extremely dull and uninteresting (Usually an exaggeration.) I was bored silly at the lecture. The dull speaker left me bored to distraction. I am bored to tears. Let's go home.
See also: bore, silly

laugh oneself silly

Fig. to laugh very, very hard. I laughed myself silly when I heard that Steven was really going to give the graduation address.
See also: laugh, silly

scared silly

frightened very much. I was scared silly by the loud explosion. We were scared silly to go into the park after dark.
See also: scare, silly

*silly as a goose

very foolish. (*Also: as ~.) Edith is as silly as a goose. She thinks that reading aloud to her house-plants will help them grow. The ad in the newspaper said this lotion would make my hair grow back, but I've been using it for a whole month and my hair is still the same. Jane: You're as silly as a goose! Do you believe everything you read in newspaper ads?
See also: goose, silly

ask a stupid question and you'll get a stupid answer

Also, ask a silly question. Your query doesn't deserve a proper answer, as in Am I hungry? ask a stupid question! One authority believes this idiom is a variant of ask me no questions and I'll tell you no fibs, which appeared in Oliver Goldsmith's play She Stoops to Conquer (1773) and was frequently repeated thereafter. [Early 1800s]
See also: and, answer, ask, get, question, stupid

scare out of one's wits

Also, frighten out of one's wits; scare stiff or silly or to death or the living daylights out of or the pants off . Terrify, make one panic, as in When the lights went out, she was scared out of her wits, or I was scared stiff that I would fail the driver's test. The first of these hyperbolic terms, scare out of one's wits, is the oldest and, like silly, suggests one is frightened enough to lose one's mind. The verb scare dates from about 1200, and out of one's wits was first recorded in William Tyndale's translation of the Bible in 1526 (I Corinthians 14:23): "Will they not say that ye are out of your wits?" They were first put together in 1697, the same period from which came scare out of one's seven senses, a usage now obsolete. The variant using daylights, which sometimes occurs without living, dates from the 1950s. Daylights at one time referred to the eyes but here means "vital organs." Frighten to death was first recorded in Charles Dickens's Barnaby Rudge (1840) and scare to death probably appeared about the same time. However, to death used as an intensifier dates from the 1500s. These terms allude to the fact that a sudden fright can precipitate cardiac arrest. Scare stiff, first recorded in 1905, alludes to the temporary paralysis that can accompany intense fear. For the last variant, see also under pants off.
See also: of, out, scare, wit

play silly buggers

act in a foolish way.
See also: bugger, play, silly

laugh yourself silly (or sick)

laugh uncontrollably or for a long time.
See also: laugh, silly

— yourself silly

be unable to act rationally because of doing something to excess.
1998 Time Out N.Y. Drink yourself silly at the long bar or chow down at the large tables in the back.
See also: silly

the silly season

the months of August and September regarded as the time when newspapers often publish trivia because of a lack of important news. chiefly British
This concept and phrase date back to the mid 19th century. In high summer Victorian London was deserted by the wealthy and important during the period in which Parliament and the law courts were in recess.
See also: season, silly

silly as a wheel

very silly. Australian
1985 John Clanchy The Lie of the Land Father Tierney was mad. Cracked as an egg, some boys said, silly as a wheel.
See also: silly, wheel

boring, silly, etc. in the exˈtreme

extremely boring, silly, etc: I must admit, it’s puzzling in the extreme just how these books found their way here.
See also: extreme

ˌdrink, ˌlaugh, ˌshout, etc. yourself ˈsilly

(informal) drink, laugh, shout, etc. so much that you cannot behave in a sensible way: Everyone was too busy laughing themselves silly to notice her quietly leave the room.
See also: silly

play ˈsilly buggers (with something)

(British English, informal) behave in a stupid and annoying way: Stop playing silly buggers and answer the question.
See also: bugger, play, silly

the ˈsilly season

(British English) the time, usually in the summer, when newspapers are full of unimportant stories because there is little serious news
See also: season, silly

stoned silly

mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. I hate to get stoned silly in public. At home—ah, that’s a different matter. He got stoned silly at the rally, and for all I know he is still there on the floor in the corner.
See also: silly, stoned
References in classic literature ?
How can you be so silly," cried her mother, "as to think of such a thing, in all this dirt
After all, Rachel," she broke off, "it's silly to pretend that because there's twenty years' difference between us we therefore can't talk to each other like human beings.
A white man's dog, adrift among the anthropophagi of Malaita, would experience all such sensations and, just as naturally, a white man's woman, a Wife- Woman, a dear, delightful Villa Kennan woman, can of herself imagine such a dog's experiences and deem his silly noises a recital of them, failing to recognize them as projections of her own delicious, sensitive, sympathetic self.
This howl was the beginning, and it led to the calling him "Sing Song Silly.
Villa Kennan the Thrush-throated Songstress, and Sing Song Silly the Irish-Terrier Tenor," her husband pictured the head-lines for her.
I 'm Polly at home and I 'm fond of being called so; but Marie is Frenchified and silly.
He showed me tattoo marks, baring his breast in the teeth of the wind and in spite of my remonstrances, for I thought it was enough to kill him; he swore horribly whenever he remembered, but more like a silly schoolboy than a man; and boasted of many wild and bad things that he had done: stealthy thefts, false accusations, ay, and even murder; but all with such a dearth of likelihood in the details, and such a weak and crazy swagger in the delivery, as disposed me rather to pity than to believe him.
Washington White's card and Lady Crackenbury's card--which our little friend had been glad enough to get a few months back, and of which the silly little creature was rather proud once--Lord
You won't be able to hold your own there, you silly little fool.
And force is a crime in the eyes of the fools, the weak and the silly who rule the roost.
And when these frays were over, and the good lord had conquered his enemies, and they were all at peace again, and he and she were rich, what happiness they would have in talking of these troubled times when he was a great soldier: and when they sat alone together in the tranquil twilight, and she had no longer reason to be anxious for the morrow, what pleasure would he have in the reflection that this was his doing--his--poor foolish Barnaby's; and in patting her on the cheek, and saying with a merry laugh, 'Am I silly now, mother--am I silly now?
If you'll let me have another word, my lord,' returned John Grueby, 'I'd give this silly fellow a caution not to stay here by himself.
no; I've swopped all my marls with the little fellows, and cobnuts are no fun, you silly, only when the nuts are green.
How can a lion come roaring at you, you silly thing?
Tom, indeed, was of opinion that Maggie was a silly little thing; all girls were silly,--they couldn't throw a stone so as to hit anything, couldn't do anything with a pocket-knife, and were frightened at frogs.