signify

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signify

1. in. to cause trouble for fun; to stir things up. (Black.) What are all these cats signifying about anyway?
2. in. to try to look more important than one really is; to brag; to strut one’s stuff. (Black.) See that dude signify like somebody important?
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, it would not be going too far to propose that the enigmatic signifier represents a specialized instance of modernist difficulty.
The discussion of examples taken from Badiou of public signifying acts, in contrast, suggests a potential for social change in statements lacking sense in the context of existing discourse because they have 'no representation in the political, or the state' (151), for instance Marx's declaration 'There is a revolutionary movement' (150), or French migrant workers' statement, 'We want our rights' (152), or the introduction of the signifier 'grace' in St.
So, Jonas' head moving down, and the stares by the other students communicating to the instructor and themselves perhaps that Jonas is not smart enough to be in their class, nay, in college, would require those signifiers or exactly those moments when those parts of their word use, gestures, and silent pauses put some of us in subject-positions to think and act on our thoughts verbally and non-verbally.
Hurston and Miller read this story as an example of a woman's subversion of (western) patriarchy, using the goat--which the two authors would have recognized as a signifier of blackness--as a vehicle of deception.
Once the bond between the signifier and signified has been loosened and the former has been liberated and set in motion, anything is possible, and words become raw material for musical improvisations.
Meaning, or the signified, is always postponed in relation to the signifier.
If the use of "dwell" resonates so powerfully as the last word celebrating the inhabitants of Penshurst and Penshurst as habitation, it is also because the signifier itself is, in its own right, inhabited--inhabited literally, by a materiality in which Renaissance poets were wont to invest exceptional "weight," namely letters.
The third desire of the discourse of the Hysteric, the desire for a new master signifier that would be adequate to the subject's being, is most evident in the cultivation of knowledge of, and appreciation of, women writers, the practice that Elaine Showalter named gynocritics (1985, 248).
The fact is that Hamlet is not simply a character but an "actor-character" ("Mimesis" 285), whose mimetic antics, like Clara Middleton's meditations, call into question the whole province of character (at least in Shakespeare's practice) and the inadequacy of any theory of representation to offer some sort of stability between signifier and signified.
Thus the erectile organ comes to symbolize the place of jouissance [ecstasy], not in itself, or even in the form of an image, but as a part lacking in the desired image: that is why it is equivalent to the [square root of -1] of the signification produced above, of the jouissance that it restores by the coefficient of its statement to the function of lack of signifier [square root of -1].
But "experience," as Jacques Derrida pointed out, "lives and proclaims itself as the exclusion of writing, that is to say of the invoking of an 'exterior,' 'sensible,' 'spatial' signifier interrupting self-presence.
Bill Clinton has allowed himself to become a floating signifier, unfixed, indeterminate, arousing a host of anxieties about gender, class, and sexuality.
Key signifier as literary device; its definition and function in literature and media.
He attributes this pluralism to the instabilities inherent in the appeal to the naked body itself as the crucial signifier of modernity.