signify

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signify

1. in. to cause trouble for fun; to stir things up. (Black.) What are all these cats signifying about anyway?
2. in. to try to look more important than one really is; to brag; to strut one’s stuff. (Black.) See that dude signify like somebody important?
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike Moore, Gibbard thinks there is no need to appeal to non-natural properties to characterize what is signified by normative terms: normative terms signify ordinary natural properties.
Certainly that escape from the missions was a survival method for individuals, as the lower classes of this region were reinforced by the exodus, but at the same time that dispersal signified the gradual disappearance of the Guarani mission Indians as a collective body.
As always with Boltanski, the image seemed a sort of relic, the precarious yield of an attempt to save something from the oblivion signified by the darkness or, at best, the half-light into which the work was plunged.
Both spouses must consent to split the gifts; consent is signified only by filing and signing Form 709, U.
It would avoid the closure of the world signified by a straightforward apocalypse, and it would avoid the closure of the text signified by an anti-apocalypse" (19).
Historians have traced its roots to the indigenous faiths of pre-Columbian Mexico where an ancient Mayan ceremony of adulthood signified a young man was eligible to be a warrior and a young woman could bear children.
New Management has signified its intention to expand the Company's existing tea import business and to expand into other business opportunities which it has been exploring and developing that have the prospect for faster growth and evidence profitability.
T) were created to fill the gap between the qualifications of professional engineers and technicians, and a new diploma (the DEUG) signified successful completion of two years of university study, whereas the traditional licence signified at least three years.
The pigtail wigs, granny sweaters, and black knee-highs her subjects donned signified the shame that was her initial focus, lending her work energy and lending her power.
The volume never offers a single, stable definition or location for the term, but, generally speaking, it is used to refer to an encounter with some disorienting otherness that signified the undeniable presence of meaningfulness even as it suspended or even cancelled all the familiar landmarks of meaning.
11] While the assumed link between photographic signifier (the photograph) and photographic signified (the subject represented) may prove more tenacious than the visually arbitrary linguistic signifier, it is still possible to repeat visual codes "with a difference" (Gates 51), and thereby trouble the assumed naturalness of photographic representation.
The downturn in livestock numbers that accompanied enclosure in the majority of provinces also signified problems.
Metonymy is the figure invoked by reformers of different stripes and with different intentions perhaps more often than any other to explain the words of institution, and at times in the disputation at Oxford, as elsewhere, Cranmer appears to invoke it: Christ "calleth the sacraments by the names of the things; for he useth the signs for the things signified: and therefore the bread is not called bread, but his body, for the excellency and dignity of the thing signified by it" (465).
Arvay's romantic return to Jim closes and resolves the romance plot, problematically smoothing over the gap or rupture that is signified by Arvay's rape.