References in classic literature ?
If he is sober enough to walk quite straight -- which he certainly does -- and to sign his name in an excellent handwriting -- which you may see for yourself on the Will -- I venture to think he is sober enough to drive us to Dumfries.
I at first sight did not care to sign this petition, because I would as soon petition a tiger to share his prey with me as our rulers to relax their grip of the stolen labor they live on.
Athos then made him a sign to take up his basket and to walk on first.
You have told me how you talk to him and how he answers you; I shall very soon learn that language by signs, Valentine, and I promise you solemnly, that instead of despair, it is happiness that awaits us.
These illustrious ladies appeared so lovely on the sign, -- they presented to the astonished eyes such an assemblage of lilies and roses, the enchanting result of the change of style in Pittrino -- they assumed the poses of sirens so Anacreontically -- that the principal echevin, when admitted to view this capital piece in the salle of Cropole, at once declared that these ladies were too handsome, of too animated a beauty, to figure as a sign in the eyes of passers-by.
He made a sign to his brother, who then took Piombo away.
Also, when discords, and quarrels, and factions are carried openly and audaciously, it is a sign the reverence of government is lost.
If he be indeed the rightful king, let them give us a sign, and let the people have a sign, that all may see.
When the poor bellringer became deaf, there had been established between him and Claude Frollo, a language of signs, mysterious and understood by themselves alone.
Aramis made a sign to the deaf and dumb driver of the carriage, whom he touched on the arm.
When the party had come to the lower levels, and the jeddak had dispersed them by a sign, none noticed that the forward fellow who had drawn so much attention to himself before the Prince of Helium departed, was no longer among the other servants.
It stood close to the roadside and over the door was a sign that read: "Miss Foolish Owl and Mr.
I'll sign the articles that I'm to sign off in San Francisco then.
Nowhere, indeed, was any sign or suggestion of life except the barking of a distant dog, which, repeated with mechanical iteration, served rather to accentuate than dispel the loneliness of the scene.
I met the seal-hunter, Pete Holt, and agreed to be his boat-puller and to sign on any schooner he signed on.