shut (one's) ears to (someone or something)

(redirected from shut their ears to)

shut (one's) ears to (someone or something)

To willfully ignore or refuse to listen to something or what someone is saying. The company is being accused of shutting its ears to employees who have presented complaints of harassment or bullying in the past. We can't shut our ears to those with differing political beliefs; they have as much of a stake in this country as we do.
See also: ear, shut

shut/close your ˈears to somebody/something

refuse to listen to somebody/something; ignore somebody/something: The government has shut its ears to our protests.
References in periodicals archive ?
The JI Ameer said that tens of thousands of Myanmar ( Arakan) Muslims had been allegedly murdered insides their homes and mosques during the last several months but the champions of human rights have shut their ears to their cries which was unfair.
The JI Ameer said that lakhs of Myanmar ( Arakan) Muslims had been murdered insides their homes and mosques during the last several months but the champions of human rights have shut their ears to their cries because in their eyes, the Muslims had no rights at all.
I wonder how long Cameron and Osborne can shut their ears to the "I told you so" chorus from respected economists.
Are they going to shut their ears to the way their minority players are blasted by Savage while he still is offered time on their Portland outlet, KXL?
The West Midlands is heading for another Christmas shopping boom as consumers shut their ears to talk of recession.
In Entheticus in Policraticum, lines 233-34, John counsels his readers to shut their ears to all grandiloquence: "Dum linguas acuunt alii, tibi calleat auris, / et sit Dulichio remige surda magis" (While others sharpen their tongues, let your ear grow calloused and be more deaf than the Ithacan oarsman).
It would decry television's stock in trade--emotional excess and servile distraction; warn against the domination of role-modeling media personalities; alert the public to the dangers of graven images, of TV's visual endowments; make audiences sit straight-backed and purposeful, steeling themselves to the fleshy temptations of bedroom politics and campaign hijinks; and urge viewers to rediscover the essence of politics and shut their ears to the siren song of cultural cynicism.