shuffle

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Related to shuffling: shuffling gait

lost in the shuffle

Lost, ignored, or forgotten amid a confusing mix of things or during a chaotic situation. A: "Where's my homework?" B: "Here, it was lost in the shuffle on the kitchen table." There was a lot going on last month, so I'm afraid some of our usual obligations got lost in the shuffle. Don't sit all the way back there, or you'll get lost in the shuffle.
See also: lost, shuffle

shuffle off this mortal coil

To die. An allusion to a line in Shakespeare's Hamlet, in which Hamlet muses on what happens to the spirit after death. I've been giving my money away to my children over the past few years—I don't want them squabbling over it when I shuffle off this mortal coil. I heard that Jenkins shuffled off this mortal coil over the weekend.
See also: coil, mortal, off, shuffle, this

shuffle off this mortal coil

Euph. to die. (Often jocular or formal euphemism. Not often used in consoling someone.) Cousin Fred shuffled off this mortal coil after suffering a heart attack. When I shuffle off this mortal coil, I want to go out in stylebells, flowers, and a long, boring funeral.
See also: coil, mortal, off, shuffle, this

lost in the shuffle

Failing to stand out among others, as in In that huge economics class Jane's afraid she'll get lost in the shuffle. This metaphoric term alludes to mixing playing cards before dealing them. [c. 1900]
See also: lost, shuffle

shuffle off

1. Get rid of, act evasively, as in They've tried to shuffle off public inquiries about the safety of their planes. This usage, dating from about 1600, also appears in the oft-quoted shuffle off this mortal coil, from Shakespeare's Hamlet (3:1), where it means "become freed from the turmoil of life," that is, "die."
2. Move away reluctantly, dragging one's feet, as in The prisoners shuffled off to their work detail. [Late 1500s]
See also: off, shuffle

lost in the shuffle

mainly AMERICAN
If someone or something gets lost in the shuffle, nobody notices them or pays them any attention. A lot of great bands are lost in the shuffle as the record companies try to get the widest market possible. It is quite possible that campaign finance reform will get lost in the shuffle of White House priorities. Note: When packs of cards are properly shuffled (= mixed), it is impossible to know where a particular card is.
See also: lost, shuffle

shuffle off this mortal coil

die. literary
Shuffle off this mortal coil is a quotation from Shakespeare 's Hamlet. This mortal coil is sometimes used independently to mean ‘the fact or state of being alive’, with the suggestion that this is a troublesome state, since coil retains here its archaic sense of ‘turmoil’.
1986 Dudley Moore Off-Beat He was just one of a number of distinguished composers who have shuffled off their mortal coil in a variety of unusual ways.
See also: coil, mortal, off, shuffle, this

be (or get) lost in the shuffle

be overlooked or missed in a confused or crowded situation. North American informal
See also: lost, shuffle

shuffle the cards

change policy or direction.
See also: card, shuffle

lose somebody/something in the ˈshuffle

(American English) (usually used in the passive) not notice somebody/something or pay attention to somebody/something because of a confusing situation: She was so busy at work, her marriage was getting lost in the shuffle.We feel that if schools are too big, it’s easy for a student to be lost in the shuffle.

shuffle off this mortal ˈcoil

(old-fashioned or humorous) die: They believe that when they shuffle off this mortal coil their souls will become stars.This expression comes from Shakespeare’s play Hamlet.
See also: coil, mortal, off, shuffle, this

shuffle off

v.
1. To go with short sliding steps, without or barely lifting the feet: The sleepy children shuffled off to bed.
2. To leave; depart: Toward the end of the evening, the guests shuffled off one by one.
3. To rid oneself of something; dispose of or relocate something: I have not been able to shuffle off my embarrassment. The computer program automatically shuffles the outdated files off to another disk.
4. To evade or shirk something, such as a responsibility: He shuffled off his responsibilities and went to the beach. She shuffled her work off onto others because she wasn't feeling well.
See also: off, shuffle

shuffle off this mortal coil

Die. This phrase that appears in Hamlet combines the archaic meaning of two words. “Shuffle” meant “rid,” while “coil” meant “troubles.” As Shakespeare put it, “What dreams may come / When we have shuffled off this mortal coil / Must give us pause.”
See also: coil, mortal, off, shuffle, this
References in classic literature ?
home in their hundreds; the chattering, grey-backed Seven Sisters, talking over the day's adventures, walked back and forth in twos and threes almost under the feet of the travellers; and shufflings and scufflings in the branches showed that the bats were ready to go out on the night-picket.
Grasping my long-sword tightly in my hand, I backed slowly along the corridor away from the thing that watched me, but ever as I retreated the eyes advanced, nor was there any sound, not even the sound of breathing, except the occasional shuffling sound as of the dragging of a dead limb, that had first attracted my attention.
Suddenly I heard the shuffling noise at my right, and, looking, saw another pair of eyes, evidently approaching from an intersecting corridor.
exclaimed different voices; and the heavy breathing of the bearers and the shuffling of their feet grew more hurried, as if the weight they were carrying were too much for them.
Clayton heard the man shuffling about in the bottom of the boat.
His last effort caused him to roll over on his back, and there he lay looking up at the stars, while behind him, coming ever nearer and nearer, he could hear the laborious shuffling, and the stertorous breathing of the Russian.
As he watched his father shuffling up the road, he had a vague regret--a wish that something had been different somewhere--a wish
You look at those little old men now," he said, pointing to a club member with bent back and projecting lip, shuffling towards them in his soft boots, "and imagine that they were shlupiks like that from their birth up.
It became evident to Elizabeth that, until some explanation of this point was offered to him, Nutty would drift about in her vicinity, moaning and shuffling his feet indefinitely.
During these absences Mrs Verloc, becoming acutely aware of the vacant place at her right hand, missed her mother very much, and stared stonily; while Stevie, from the same reason, kept on shuffling his feet, as though the floor under the table were uncomfortably hot.
A shuffling step was soon heard on the stone floor of the hall, and the door was opened by an old man, bent and dried, but with keen eyes.
His shuffling footstep coming towards them caused her to retreat to the other end of the room.
Here he walked even faster than before; nor did he linger until he had again turned into a court; when, as if conscious that he was now in his proper element, he fell into his usual shuffling pace, and seemed to breathe more freely.
Supple to twist and turn as the Rogue has ever been, he is sufficiently rigid now; and not without much shuffling of attendant feet, and tilting of his bier this way and that way, and peril even of his sliding off it and being tumbled in a heap over the balustrades, can he be got up stairs.
At first there was a great shaking of hands and shuffling of feet, succeeded by the presentation of the nosegay; for a voice, supposed by the listener to be that of Mr Witherden the Notary, was heard to exclaim a great many times, 'oh, delicious