shrapnel


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shrapnel

n. a few small coins left as a tip. He just toked me a few bits of schrapnel!
References in periodicals archive ?
Mohammed Tawfiq al-Jamal (26), who sustained a shrapnel wound to the left arm;
Tender notice number : MPPD/TENDER NO -473 & Work No: Tactical Anti Shrapnel Goggles
A woman also sustained shrapnel injuries in al-Tahrir Square in al-Abbassiyeen area
Finally, after about two weeks I was transported to the navy hospital in Hawaii, where I was treated for three months, first having surgery to remove the shrapnel from my hip, which was never completely removed, then having skin grafts to close the open wound.
Recovered was a shrapnel from an improvised explosive device which was planted few feet away from the entrance of the public market.
Additional shrapnel hit a day care center in Bnei Brak.
The burns and shrapnel on his body still burn whenever water touches his skin.
the doctors weren't able to reach some of the shrapnel in his brain," he said.
He said that even if the shrapnel were travelling at a low-velocity of 100m/s, one would still not want to be hit with it, as that's the velocity of a shotgun blast.
KIEV, Ukraine -- Some people were hit by bricks or sprayed with shrapnel from stun grenades.
If human remains have internal contamination due to shrapnel, then whenever possible, the shrapnel will be removed prior to shipment.
Israeli forces also assaulted Jerusalem mufti Sheikh Mohammad Hassan and minister of Jerusalem affairs Adnan Husseini, while Fatah leader Hatem Abdel Kader was hit with shrapnel in the face.
The unexploded British artillery shell, full of shrapnel balls, was blown up in a controlled explosion yesterday after being discovered near the popular stately home.
Two Syrian boys were brought to a hospital in Israel overnight, both suffering from massive shrapnel wounds sustained during the bloody civil war which has gripped their homeland, a spokesman said on Wednesday.
Consultant dietitian Bill Shrapnel, deputy chairman of the Sydney University Nutrition Research Foundation, also debunks the new draft prepared by a National Health and Medical Research Council working group.