show biz

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show biz

n. show business. Anybody who can make a living in show biz has to be clever and talented.
See also: biz, show
References in periodicals archive ?
Ma vie en cinemascope is a show-biz, rise--and--fall story that never lets you forget about the protagonist's fall.
It was show-biz, of course, but show-biz refracted through an anthropologist's prism.
STAR CHEF: Sophie Montelli, former private chef of show-biz luminaries Rod Stewart, Ed McMahon, Geena Davis and Jerry Weintraub has unveiled her Sophie's Bakery Cafe at 2337 Roscomare Road, Bel-Air.
Set to music by David Byrne, this is Tharp at her show-biz best.
And it's Gold, who guides the career of an up-and-coming young actor loosely based on executive producer Mark Wahlberg, who has turned Piven from that reliable guy on ``Ellen,'' ``The Larry Sanders Show'' and a bunch of his childhood friend John Cusack's movies into something of a show-biz legend.
The contributions of Moulton and Pucci are of the typical "rock equals sex" syndrome, with endless hip gyrations and show-biz razzmatazz evocative of too many bad Chorus Line imitations.
Studio City; (818) 766-8311: The West Hollywood night spot now has a full-service Valley venue geared for promoted events and private show-biz parties, plus weekend dance nights.
Many of the jokes depend on familiarity with Coogan's reputation in Britain as a bit of a cad and a guy who's made much of his living pretending to be venal show-biz types, so don't expect to understand a portion of the jokey specifics.
On a whim, she sinks her fortune into a Soho theater and hires a show-biz pro, Vivian Van Damm (Bob Hoskins), to run it for her.
Though Deschanel comes from a show-biz family (father Caleb is a five-time Oscar-nominated cinematographer, and her sister is actress Zooey), ``Bones'' is her biggest gig to date, and she's still adjusting.
Not Neil Diamond, who drew thousands down ash-choked freeways to Staples Center, where the performer reeled off five decades of hits in a refreshing two-hour show that was thankfully short of show-biz smoke and mirrors.
In a nutshell: Often hilarious, though the show-biz milieu has become awfully familiar.
And Jayma Mays, a fixture on just about every HBO show-biz series, makes an amusing movie debut as a stressed colleague at Lisa's swank Miami hotel.