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show

/bare (one's) teeth
To express a readiness to fight; threaten defiantly.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Greg Daniels, executive producer of "The Office," said "The Daily Show" served as a perfect in to his show for Carell and Helms.
With all the glass-filled resins being processed, lots of exhibitors will show more wear-resistant screws and barrels.
com specialize in trade shows for supplier diversity, offering multiple supplier diversity fairs each year.
Hanna-Barbera's cartoons ranged from popular and forgettable Saturday morning shows like "Huckleberry Hound" and "Quick-DrawMcGraw" in the 1960s to "Penelope Pitstop" and "Hong Kong Phooey" in the 1970s.
Effect of Processing Variables on Impact Properties--Pre-conditioning of the base iron and late-inoculation shows a slight improvement in the impact values of 12-mm sections but does not show any effect in 3-mm sections.
The main costs associated with producing such a show are the studio fees (usually about $100/hour), the cost of reproducing the tapes (relatively modest if tapes are purchased in large quantities) and transportation to and from the studio for guests, something that might not be required in a smaller city or town.
A June 1997 report by the Annenberg Public Policy Center, which conducts continuing research on children's television, outlines a number of "unintended consequences" of the act, including a decline in locally produced children's programming and network shows that were "educationally weaker" than many of the syndicated and local shows they were replacing.
There was a show in Las Vegas that went from regional to international, it didn't even go to national first," she complained.
However, a strong contingent of ranking officers dressed in the uniform of the day will add to the credibility of the show.
To satisfy public demand, he soon repeated the whole show -- an unprecedented encore.
Spike Lee, the most successful black director in mainstream cinema history, had a development deal with CBS, but the show was not picked up.
Four people were already working on the show, but the two main directors had health problems and the other two were reluctant to take on an exhibition of this size alone.
At once, this sordid mess provides the viewer with the voyeuristic thrill of seeing a family conflict that one really shouldn't observe, the vicarious thrill of stripping before an audience, and, ultimately, the confirmation that a dull, "normal" lifestyle is superior to that of the women on the show.
The trade show industry must be the "Wrong-Way Corrigan" of marketing media.