shovel

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put someone to bed with a shovel

Sl. to bury someone; to kill and bury someone. Shut up! You want me to put you to bed with a shovel? The leader of the gang was getting sort of tired and old, so one of the younger thugs put him to bed with a shovel.
See also: bed, put, shovel

put to bed with a shovel

 
1. Sl. dead and buried. (Alludes to burying someone.) You wanna be put to bed with a shovel? fust keep talking that way. Poor old Jake. He was put to bed with a shovel last March.
2. Sl. intoxicated. He wasn't just tipsy. He was put to bed with a shovel! Dead drunk? Yes, he was put to bed with a shovel.
See also: bed, put, shovel

cling like shit to a shovel

and stick like shit to a shovel
1. in. to stick or adhere [to someone or something] tightly. (Usually objectionable.) That oily stuff sticks like shit to a shovel.
2. in. to be very dependent on someone; to follow someone around. (Often with an indirect object. Usually objectionable.) She’s so dependent. She clings to him like shit to a shovel. He hates her, but he sticks like shit to a shovel.
See also: cling, like, shit, shovel

stick like shit to a shovel

verb
See also: like, shit, shovel, stick

put someone to bed with a shovel

tv. to bury someone; to kill and bury someone. (see also put to bed with a shovel.) The leader of the gang was getting sort of tired and old, so one of the younger thugs put him to bed with a shovel.
See also: bed, put, shovel

put to bed with a shovel

1. mod. dead and buried. (From put someone to bed with a shovel.) You wanna be put to bed with a shovel? Just keep talking that way.
2. mod. alcohol intoxicated. (From sense 1) He wasn’t just tipsy. He was put to bed with a shovel!
See also: bed, put, shovel
References in classic literature ?
Then, by God," replied Tarrant, "if you won't take a shovel you'll take a pickax.
Looks good to me," he concluded, picking up his pick and shovel and gold-pan.
Feverish with desire, with aching back and stiffening muscles, with pick and shovel gouging and mauling the soft brown earth, the man toiled up the hill.
Rotten quartz," was his conclusion as, with the shovel, he cleared the bottom of the hole of loose dirt.
The usual hurried, feverish toil in the claim was suspended; the pick and shovel were left sticking in the richest "pay gravel;" the toiling millionaires themselves, ragged, dirty, and perspiring, lay panting under the nearest shade, where the pipes went out listlessly, and conversation sank to monosyllables.
To a rabbit hutch, and get a confounded old shovel .
Yet the Shovel was practically deserted, and the Virgin, standing by the stove, yawned with uncovered mouth and said to Charley Bates:-
And when God Almighty washes Daylight's soul out on the last big slucin' day," MacDonald interrupted, "why, God Almighty'll have to shovel gravel along with him into the sluice-boxes.
Whisper that there's a gold strike at the North Pole, and that same inevitable white-skinned creature will set out at once, armed with pick and shovel, a side of bacon, and the latest patent rocker--and what's more, he'll get there.
Toward the top of the heap I had to handle the coal a second time, tossing it up with a shovel.
As for the pickaxe, I made use of the iron crows, which were proper enough, though heavy; but the next thing was a shovel or spade; this was so absolutely necessary, that, indeed, I could do nothing effectually without it; but what kind of one to make I knew not.
The excessive hardness of the wood, and my having no other way, made me a long while upon this machine, for I worked it effectually by little and little into the form of a shovel or spade; the handle exactly shaped like ours in England, only that the board part having no iron shod upon it at bottom, it would not last me so long; however, it served well enough for the uses which I had occasion to put it to; but never was a shovel, I believe, made after that fashion, or so long in making.
This was not so difficult to me as the making the shovel: and yet this and the shovel, and the attempt which I made in vain to make a wheelbarrow, took me up no less than four days - I mean always excepting my morning walk with my gun, which I seldom failed, and very seldom failed also bringing home something fit to eat.
At a nimbler trot, as if the shovel over his shoulder stimulated him by reviving old associations, Mr Boffin ascended the 'serpentining walk', up the Mound which he had described to Silas Wegg on the occasion of their beginning to decline and fall.