shove it

shove it

A rude invective expressing disdain, contempt, disgust, or anger to someone. I've taken enough of the boss's crap—tell him he can shove it, because I quit! Shove it, Bill! You don't know what's best for me!
See also: shove

ˈshove it

(informal, especially American English) used to say rudely that you will not accept or do something: ‘The boss wants that report now.’ ‘Yeah? Tell him he can shove it.’
See also: shove
References in periodicals archive ?
So the trick is a switch pop shove it and then you catch it and revert it; you turn it back frontside 180.
Before a flight, don't take the card-also called the user data module (UDM) NSN 584 I-01-201-8645--and just shove it into the box.
you just keep talking and grab it with one hand and shove it under a couch.
He said: 'The United fans were trying to hammer me and get on my back and I wanted to shove it down their mouths.
He said: "They were trying to hammer me and get on my back and I just wanted to shove it down their mouths.
I had full confidence we could take that ball and shove it down their throat, and next thing I know, we're off the field.
You have no idea what 50,000 copies of something looks like until you try to shove it into a car," says Greer, who by June 2001 was more interested in signing up new advertisers than spending close to a week delivering publications.
And a blast some distance from an asteroid, designed to shove it into a slightly different orbit, might not work either; the asteroid might soak up the energy like a sponge.
It's commendable that E-Trade has warned customers to exercise caution; but it's also saying that the stock market can't make you rich enough to tell your boss to take this job and shove it.
Why don't you pry your atrophied little brain out of your reeking, cancerous colon and shove it up your weevil-infested, snot-packed nose where it belongs.
A few years ago, his novel got published, and he told the advertising agency he'd been working for to shove it.
But I have a problem when some of them shove it in my face.
Isaacs wore a backpack that would shoot fireworks out in a swirl of sparks and smoke, while Taylor would yank an enormous, quick-inflating ball above his head and shove it through the crowd like an erratic tight end scoring the winning touchdown, in the meantime, the bearded bassist used his chord as a lasso, corralling the cool kids into movement or otherwise forcing them to suffer the consequences (tailing to their ass on the hard gravel yard).
He is best known for ``Take This Job and Shove It,'' which went to No.