shed blood


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shed blood

Also, spill blood. Wound or kill someone, especially violently. For example, It was a bitter fight but fortunately no blood was shed, or A great deal of blood has been spilled in this family feud. Both of these terms allude to causing blood to flow and fall on the ground. The first dates from the 1200s. The variant amplifies the verb spill, which from about 1300 to 1600 by itself meant "slay" or "kill"; it was first recorded about 1125.
See also: blood, shed

shed blood

1. To wound or kill in a violent manner.
2. To be wounded or killed: "For he today that sheds his blood with me / Shall be my brother" (Shakespeare).
See also: blood, shed

shed (someone's) blood

To wound someone or take someone's life, especially with violence.
See also: blood, shed
References in periodicals archive ?
However, most shed blood was still returned to the heart-lung machine via the cardiotomy sucker.
The carnage is the only common link between two intractable sides all too willing to shed blood for a cause.
Yet the trail from Atlanta is hostile, populated by isolated White communities who have disconnected themselves from the urban metropolises, ready to shed blood to preserve their sovereignty.
Admirable as their courage was, however, it was as nothing to the bravery of the people of Northern Ireland and their leaders ( political, religious, industrial and social ( for it was they who took the real risks and shed blood for it.
How can a people, how can a continent, not shed blood over this?
Post-operative retrieval of shed blood was attempted for 99 consecutive patients undergoing primary TKJA between February and July 2005 using the donor salvage and re-infusion drains.
Boston Archbishop Sean O'Malley reflecting on his new cardinal's vestments that are red to symbolize a willingness to shed blood for the church
May I enlighten Ron to the fact that a lot of us shed blood, sweat and tears over half of our lifetime to pay off mortgages, driving to work in scrapyard level cars, paying car tax, petrol tax and income tax for the sake of having a roof over our heads, in my case as a plant driver on construction sites which everyone knows is a here-today-gone-tomorrow occupation.
RB says: A hugely experienced former England captain who shed blood for his country - and never jumped out of an "ooh, mind me foot" tackle
Yet even through his misjudgments and personal sufferings, Lafayette never abandoned this driving belief that all humans were entitled to the liberty for which he shed blood in the United States.
Here in the fat First World we are smug and arrogant perhaps because we haven't had to shed blood for Christ or defend our soil.
Ancient wrongs shed blood today, Wrongs today shed blood tomorrow.
Wales shed blood, sweat and tears against France at the Millennium Stadium yesterday - epitomised by wounded skipper Colin Charvis, above.
But God said to me, 'You shall not build a house for my name, because you are a man of wars; you have shed blood.
South Korean Consul General in Osaka Yu Byong U criticized Thursday the Japanese government's decision to send noncombat troops to Iraq as ''lacking debate on whether it is prepared to shed blood for international peace.