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Related to sharks: Great white sharks

jump the shark

1. In television programming, to resort to using an obvious or unbelievable gimmick in a scene, episode, or storyline as a means of maintaining viewership, especially when the show's quality and/or popularity has begun to decline. The phrase alludes to the sitcom Happy Days, in which the character Fonzie (Henry Winkler) jumps over a shark on water-skis in the fifth season. This show used to have some of the wittiest writing in television, but they really jumped the shark when they introduced a contrived alien invasion in the seventh season.
2. By extension, to signal, especially through a conspicuous activity, event, or maneuver, a decline in the progress or evolution of something (e.g., a company, a brand, a political endeavor, etc.). The global tech giant, whose smartphone brand transformed the everyday technological landscape, seems to have jumped the shark this week when they revealed a line of computer-synced sneakers touted as their new flagship product. The governor was accused of jumping the shark during his re-election campaign by joining in with the cheerleading squad at his former high school's football game.
See also: jump, shark

shark bait

1. slang A person swimming or surfing alone in the ocean. We sat on the beach with our drinks, watching the foolish shark bait going into the water alone for an evening swim.
2. (Hawaii slang) A very pale beachgoer, especially a tourist. (Supposedly because pale skin is attractive to sharks.) We don't hang out in this part of town too often in the summer, as it gets overwhelmed with shark bait this time of year.
3. A particularly naïve or gullible person who is an ideal target for a scam, graft, or con. He'd been in the game of scamming people for so long that he could spot shark bait from a mile away. Don't you dare wear that fanny pack out in town. We'll look like shark bait to the locals!
See also: bait, shark

wouldn't shout if a shark bit him

Cheap, miserly. In Australia, "to shout" is to buy someone something, usually a drink. Primarily heard in Australia. You expect Steve to buy you a drink? Ha! That guy wouldn't shout if a shark bit him!
See also: bit, if, shark, shout

shark baiter

A person swimming or surfing alone in the ocean. Primarily heard in Australia. We sat on the beach with our drinks, watching the foolish shark baiter going into the water alone for an evening swim.
See also: shark

swim with sharks

1. Literally, to be in the water with sharks. My brother is a real adventurer—he's bungee jumped before and has even swam with sharks!
2. To be involved with cunning, possibly dangerous, people. I know you think you're a hustler, but you're swimming with sharks now—you could lose all your money against these guys. Before you start swimming with sharks, consider this—the last guy who went into business with them wound up dead!
See also: shark, swim

jump the shark

(of a television series or film) reach a point at which far-fetched events are included merely for the sake of novelty, indicative of a decline in quality. US informal
This phrase is said to refer to an episode of the long-running US television series Happy Days, in which the central character (the Fonz) jumped over a shark while waterskiing.
See also: jump, shark

ˈjump the shark

(American English) if a television programme jumps the shark, it starts to decline in quality and introduces ridiculous ideas in order to maintain the interest of the publicThis comes from the TV series Happy Days, in which on one show a character jumped over a shark while waterskiing.
See also: jump, shark

shark

1. n. a swindler; a confidence operator. (Underworld.) The sharks were lined up ten deep to get at the blue-eyed new owner of the bowling alley.
2. n. a lawyer. (Derogatory.) Some shark is trying to squeeze a few grand out of me.

shark repellent

n. something that prevents corporate takeovers. (Securities markets.) Acme Systems tried again to get its board to approve a shark repellent to keep the Widget cartel from acquiring it.
See also: shark

jump the shark

To undergo a sustained decline in quality or popularity.
See also: jump, shark
References in periodicals archive ?
There have been several instances in the past when surfers were attacked by sharks, some of the encounters turning out to be deadly.
banning the sale of shark fins would not make it illegal to continue to catch and kill sharks in the United States.
Sixth, humans do not need shark fin soup to live but sharks need their fins to survive.
Thus, saving sharks means we are also saving the future of our ocean, he added.
A total 9 species of sharks recorded from this study which was Dog shark (Scoliodon laticaudus), Hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini), Milk shark (Rhizoprionodon acutus), Tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier), Silky shark (Carcharhinus falciformis), Ridge back cat shark (Chiloscyllium indicum), Black tip reef shark (Carcharhinus melanopterus), Bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas) and Spot tail shark (Carcharhinus sorrah).
Licensed shark fishermen could still catch sharks and sell the meat - just not the fins, which are highly profitable.
BURSA (CyHAN)- A group of fishermen caught a giant glass- eye breed shark, which weighs 673 kilograms, in the Marmara Sea off the Turkish city of Bursa on Friday.
Fifteen or 20 years earlier, the crew would release the sharks; now, they were killing the sharks for their fins.
In a new study, University of Florida researchers have named and described an ancient intermediate form of the white shark, Carcharodon hubbelli, suggesting that the modern white shark likely descended from broad-toothed mako sharks.
Dubai: The UAE is not a major harvester of local Gulf sharks despite it being the fifth largest exporter of shark fins to Hong Kong, insisted a Ministry of Environment and Water official at a shark conference in Dubai on Tuesday.
For general readers, Bright, a freelance author, scriptwriter, and former TV producer from the UK, describes shark biology and behavior; shark fossils and history, including primitive sharks living today (the goblin shark, frilled shark, sixgill and sevengill sharks, sleeper sharks, and megamouth); the great white shark and its relatives; requiem sharks and hammerheads; sharks without the typical fusiform shape, including flat sharks, camouflaged sharks, the dogfish, the whale shark, and catsharks; and their interactions with people, including attacks and conservation.
Summary: For most of us, the subject of sharks start and end with Discovery Channel's popular show 'Shark Week' or 1980s' hit ction thriller 'Jaws'.
They all love sharks and each would like to sit down and have lunch or dinner (one-on-one) with you and explain why.
Sharks are the much maligned apex predators that frequent horror films and sensationalized nature documentaries.
Every year, a large number of sharks are caught accidentally while fishermen target other fish.