shabby


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Related to shabby: Shabby chic, not too shabby

Not bad (at all).

 
1. [Someone or something is] quite satisfactory. Bill: How do you like your new teacher? Jane: Not bad. Bob: Is this pen okay? Bill: I guess. Yeah. Not bad.
2. [Someone or something is] really quite good. (The person or thing can be named, as in the examples.) John: How do you like that new car of yours? Mary: Not bad. Not bad at all. Tom: This one looks great to me. What do you think? Sue: It's not bad.
See also: bad, not

not too shabby

 
1. Inf. nice; well done. (With emphasis on shabby.) Is that your car? Not too shabby'.' That play was not too shabby.
2. Inf. very shabby; very poor indeed. (With emphasis on too. Sarcastic.) Did you see that shot she missed? Not too shabby! What a way to treat someone. Not too shabby!
See also: not, shabby

not bad

reasonably good Thirteen bucks - that's not bad for lunch.
Usage notes: often used in conversation: “How are you?” “Not bad.” also used in the forms not too bad, not that bad, and not so bad: It takes me about an hour to get to work, which is not that bad.
Related vocabulary: not half bad
See also: bad, not

not bad

Also, not half bad; not so or too bad ; not too shabby. Fairly good, as in Not bad, said the conductor, but we need to play the scherzo again, or The movie wasn't half bad, but Jerry wanted to go home, or Our garden's not too bad this year, or How are things going?-Not too shabby. All of the terms involving bad, which imply that something is less bad than it might be, date from the mid-1700s. The last variant, using shabby in the sense of "inferior," is slang of the late 1900s.
See also: bad, not

not too shabby

1. mod. [with emphasis on shabby] nice; well done. Is that your car? Not too shabby!
2. mod. [with emphasis on too] very shabby; very poor indeed. (Sarcastic.) What a way to treat someone. Not too shabby!
See also: not, shabby
References in classic literature ?
When they came to the village, the son followed the fox's counsel, and without looking about him went to the shabby inn and rested there all night at his ease.
Then thought he to himself, 'It will be a very droll thing to bring away such a fine bird in this shabby cage'; so he opened the door and took hold of it and put it into the golden cage.
She was neatly, but very quietly attired; so much so, indeed, that it seemed as though her dress, if it had been worn by one who imparted fewer graces of her own to it, might have looked poor and shabby.
In damp weather, the place is rendered close, by the steams of moist acts of parliament and frouzy petitions; general postmen grow faint as they enter its infected limits, and shabby figures in quest of franks, flit restlessly to and fro like the troubled ghosts of Complete Letter-writers departed.
As there was a stream of people pouring into a shabby house not far from the entrance, he waited until they had made their way in, and then making up to the servant, ventured to inquire if he knew where Mr Gregsbury lived.
The servant was a very pale, shabby boy, who looked as if he had slept underground from his infancy, as very likely he had.
He looked about him sullenly; and when I pointed out in the distance the rounded front of the Eastern Hotel at the bifurcation of two very broad, mean, shabby thoroughfares, rising like a grey stucco tower above the lowly roofs of the dirty-yellow, two-storey houses, he only grunted disapprovingly.
The broad interminable perspective of the East India Dock Road, the great perspective of drab brick walls, of grey pavement, of muddy roadway rumbling dismally with loaded carts and vans lost itself in the distance, imposing and shabby in its spacious meanness of aspect, in its immeasurable poverty of forms, of colouring, of life--under a harsh, unconcerned sky dried by the wind to a clear blue.
Every moment people were passing close by us, singly, in two and threes; the inhabitants of that end of the town where life goes on unadorned by grace or splendour; they passed us in their shabby garments, with sallow faces, haggard, anxious or weary, or simply without expression, in an unsmiling sombre stream not made up of lives but of mere unconsidered existences whose joys, struggles, thoughts, sorrows and their very hopes were miserable, glamourless, and of no account in the world.
And all the time the stream of shabby people was hastening by us, with the continuous dreary shuffling of weary footsteps on the flagstones.
They were got about two miles beyond Barnet, and it was now the dusk of the evening, when a genteel-looking man, but upon a very shabby horse, rode up to Jones, and asked him whether he was going to London; to which Jones answered in the affirmative.
Such was the homily with which he improved and pointed the occasion to the company in the Lodge before turning into the sallow yard again, and going with his own poor shabby dignity past the Collegian in the dressing-gown who had no coat, and past the Collegian in the sea-side slippers who had no shoes, and past the stout greengrocer Collegian in the corduroy knee-breeches who had no cares, and past the lean clerk Collegian in buttonless black who had no hopes, up his own poor shabby staircase to his own poor shabby room.
This comparatively small company--about thirty dancers--had its proficiency at quick costume changes tested almost as stringently as its dance abilities, and the production--although modest to a fault--didn't look exactly shabby.
Mimi Rogers and cute starlet Brittany Murphy are also in the mix, and Ground's writers aren't so shabby either: Harvey Fierstein, Terrence McNally, and Paula Vogel are weaving the tales that span three decades a la HBO's If These Walls Could Talk movies.
TIME WAS WHEN MEXICANS paid a pittance for a local telephone and got shabby service in return.