sext

(redirected from sexting)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sext

1. noun A sexually-explicit text message, often including a photo. I was mortified when my mom saw the sext my boyfriend had sent me.
2. verb To send someone such a message. I was mortified when my mom caught me sexting my boyfriend.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, because sexting tends to be an impulsive digital behavior, like pornography use, this suggests that teens with higher levels of religious commitment might be less likely to sext or use the Internet excessively.
ADVICE FOR PARENTS who are concerned about their child sexting can heed this advice from the NSPCC.
Most studies on the relationship between personality and sexting have been conducted among university students.
Parents can use public cases such as Weiner's as teachable moments: sexting is not 'okay.
In the last year the numbers of children counselled by Childline about sexting have risen 15% to almost 1,400 - around four a day.
Matt Forde, of NSPCC Scotland, said: "It's vital parents talk to their children and that young people feel empowered to say no to sexting requests.
MORE than a third of Britons do not think sexting another person when they are in a relationship is cheating, a poll has found.
The current study expands the definition of sexting to include different types of sext content (i.
This series addresses adolescents and marijuana, sex, and sexting by using current, relevant information and statistics, field expert commentary, and numerous teen voices interspersed among its prose.
There isn't a school in the United States that hasn't dealt with the issue of sexting -- what's different about this is it's large scale," Welsh said.
The animated videos that will be used to address the issue of sexting, in particular the non-consensual sharing of intimate images and videos, as part of the relationships and sexuality education curriculum of the junior cycle in post- primary schools in ireland.
So suggests Amy Adele Hasinoff, an assistant professor of communications at the University of Colorado, Denver, in her counterintuitive but convincing new book, Sexting Panic: Rethinking Criminalization, Privacy, and Consent (University of Illinois Press).
The text discusses the phenomenon of sexting through the lens of gender and gender studies.