set someone back

set (one) back

1. To cost someone a specific amount of money. Getting the car fixed is going to set me back nearly a grand. It's estimated the failed product set the company back roughly $2 million.
2. To delay someone for a specific amount of time. That computer virus wiped out our data and set us back nearly a month in our work. He was supposed to arrive by 9, but the traffic jam set him back about an hour.
See also: back, set

set someone back

tv. to cost someone. This bracelet set me back plenty.
See also: back, set
References in periodicals archive ?
Citizens Advice Scotland has long argued that this is a necessary step as it can often be those emergency or unexpected expenses such as a car or household repair that can set someone back in their regular debt payments as they try to cope with that too.
The company's garage door skin is fitted for pounds 299 - around a quarter of the cost of an equivalent new garage door which would set someone back around pounds 1,200.
Costs start at around pounds 250 for basic treatments such as collagen lip enhancements or botox, but more radical cosmetic surgery such as a facelift can set someone back more than pounds 5000.
It states that although costs start at around pounds 250 for basic treatments such as collagen lip enhancements or botox, more radical cosmetic surgery such as a facelift or tummy tuck can set someone back more than pounds 5,000.
For instance, an air ambulance could set someone back pounds 100,000 or a simple sunstroke can cost up to pounds 8,000 in medical bills.
Without adequate insurance, a cancer diagnosis can result in nearly $50,000 for treatment not including surgery costs, while 12 months of post-heart attack care can set someone back $26,000, according to Symmetry Health Data Systems, National ETG Benchmarks, 2006.
The company's glass-reinforced polyester garage-door skin is fitted for pounds 299 - almost a quarter of the cost of an equivalent new garage door which would set someone back nearer pounds 1,200.