selves


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a shadow of (one's) former self

Someone or something that has changed dramatically to become decreased in vivacity in some way, often following negative circumstances or some traumatic event. Ever since Tim was in that accident, he's been a shadow of his former self. She's so quiet now, like a shadow of her former self. Does anyone know what happened to the bubbly girl we once knew? Many of the town's residents moved away, leaving it a shadow of its former self.
See also: former, of, shadow

be a shadow of (someone or something's) former self

To be weaker or inferior in comparison to how someone or something was previously, often due to negative circumstances. After suffering from a prolonged illness, Sharon was a shadow of her former self. This town is a shadow of its former self after so many of its residents have moved away.
See also: former, of, shadow

be a ghost of (someone or something's) former self

To be weaker or inferior in comparison to how someone or something was previously, often due to negative circumstances. After suffering from a prolonged illness, Sharon was a ghost of her former self. This town is a ghost of its former self after so many of its residents have moved away.
See also: former, ghost, of

a shadow of (one's) old self

Someone or something that has changed dramatically to become decreased in vivacity in some way, often following negative circumstances or some traumatic event. Tom's been nothing but a shadow of his old self since that accident, his bubbly, outgoing persona replaced by gloom and seriousness. The mass emigration of workers from the country during the recession has left it a mere shadow of its old self.
See also: of, old, shadow
References in periodicals archive ?
Selves leave no fossils, so we cannot know for certain how the first colonial (multicellular) organisms came to sense their selves.
In general, people rarely think about their selves but act as if such entities must exist.
However, as Michael Schoenfeldt's Bodies and Selves in Early Modern England makes clear, it is still quite possible to say important and original things about both bodies and selves, and about the ways in which early modern writers imagined each in terms of the other.
Guernsey uses this observation to argue against Stephen Greenblatt and others who can f ind only socially constructed selves in the Renaissance, only what amount to Winnicottian "false selves.
People have a need to view them selves as good and meaningful citizens of their cultures," Heine remarks.
Males also tended to express higher levels of satisfaction with their physical selves than did their female classmates.