seed

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plant a/the seed of doubt (in someone's mind)

To cause someone to have doubts, worries, or concerns (about something); to introduce someone to a doubtful or worrisome idea. The candidate was doing very well in the polls six months ago, but it seems that this smear campaign has been effective in planting a seed of doubt in the minds of voters. Recent economic turbulence in the Eurozone has planted the seed of doubt about the strength of the economy's recovery. Every time you act suspiciously like that, it plants a seed of doubt in my mind about your fidelity.
See also: doubt, of, plant, seed

sow a/the seed of doubt (in someone's mind)

To cause someone to have doubts, worries, or concerns (about something); to introduce someone to a doubtful or worrisome idea. The candidate was doing very well in the polls six months ago, but it seems that this smear campaign has been effective in sowing a seed of doubt in the minds of voters. Recent economic turbulence in the Eurozone has sown the seed of doubt about the strength of the economy's recovery. Jim's suspicious behavior sowed a seed of doubt in Jenny's mind about his fidelity.
See also: doubt, of, seed, sow

in seed

Covered in grass seed. I'm really glad we're getting all this rain now that the yard is in seed. It will be lush with grass soon enough!
See also: seed

spill (one's) seed

slang To ejaculate. Think about something other than spilling your seed for once!
See also: seed, spill

go to seed

 
1. and run to seed Lit. [for a plant] to grow long enough to produce seed; [for a plant] to spend its energy going to seed. The lettuce went to seed and we couldn't eat it. Plants like that ought not to be allowed to go to seed.
2. and run to seed Fig. [for a lawn or a plant] to produce seeds because it has not had proper care. You've got to mow the grass. It's going to seed. Don't let the lawn go to seed. It looks so—seedy!
3. Fig. [for something] to decline in looks, status, or utility due to lack of care. (The same as run to seed.) This old coat is going to seed. Have to get a new one. The front of the house is going to seed. Let's get it painted.
See also: seed

Good seed makes a good crop.

Prov. Starting with good materials will help you get good results. Jill: Elsie and Jim are going to have a baby. Jane: I'm sure it will be a good child, since they're both such good people. Good seed makes a good crop. I am sure Robert's business will flourish. He's capable and honest, and good seed makes a good crop.
See also: crop, good, make, seed

go to seed

to get into a much worse condition I almost didn't recognize John. He's really gone to seed since his wife left him.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of plants that go to seed (stop producing flowers and start producing seeds)
See also: seed

plant a seed

to do something that will develop more in the future I'm not just trying to sell tickets, I hope to plant a seed that will build audiences for opera.
See also: plant, seed

sow the seeds (of something)

also plant the seeds
to do something that will cause a particular result in the future Religious conflict sowed the seeds of the government's downfall. Officials say they are planting the seeds for freedom and democracy.
See also: seed, sow

go/run to seed

to stop taking care of your appearance so that you no longer look attractive I almost didn't recognize John. He's really gone to seed since his wife left him.
See also: seed

seed money

  (American & Australian)
money that is used to start a business or other activity With $250,000 in seed money they started to recruit executives and advisers for their new venture.
See also: money, seed

sow the seeds of something

to do something that will cause an unpleasant situation in the future He may be sowing the seeds of his own destruction by using violence against his people.
See also: of, seed, sow

run to seed

Also, go to seed. Become devitalized or worn out; deteriorate, as in I went back to visit my old elementary school, and sadly, it has really run to seed, or The gold medalist quickly went to seed after he left competition. This term alludes to plants that, when allowed to set seed after flowering, either taste bitter, as in the case of lettuce, or do not send out new buds, as is true of annual flowers. Its figurative use dates from the first half of the 1800s.
See also: run, seed
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite deep scientific skepticism about the efficacy of modifying weather, cloud seeding has grown into a big business.
Texas is currently seeding clouds across one-quarter of the state, according to the program's administrator, George Bomar of the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission in Austin.
Studies in Texas going back to 1985 indicate that seeding clouds with silver iodide does produce extra rainfall when averaged over a several-year period, says Bomar.
Skeptics and proponents agree that cloud seeding cannot cure droughts because the technique requires that the sky already hold enough moisture to form clouds.
It may be that effects of cloud seeding will always remain foggy.
The only problem is no one can say for sure that seeding causes the increases in precipitation seen where the clouds are juiced.
We just know based on some studies, which show cloud seeding does work.
Seeding also helps create rain to fill Mono Lake and replenish the Owens Valley, two areas the city has ravaged to quench the thirst of the desert dwellers in the Los Angeles basin.
The problem with cloud seeding is that it works to a certain extent, but you can't control when and where it's going to rain,'' he said.
As a science, cloud seeding was developed in the late 1940s and '50s and is accepted throughout the world.