scrape


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Related to scrape: scrape off

scrape (someone or something) up

To find and gather or collect (things or people) from various sources or locations. I managed to scrape up enough cash to get a bus out to Vancouver to see my girlfriend this weekend. How are we ever going to scrape enough people up to form a team by this weekend?
See also: scrape, up

scrape (someone or something) up off (something)

To peel or gather something or someone up from some surface, such as the floor or the road, especially when that person or thing is or seems to be stuck to it. I passed out after drinking at the party until 6 AM, and I had to be scraped up off the floor the next morning. I spent about an hour last night scraping dried pizza cheese up off the carpet.
See also: off, scrape, up

pinch and scrape

To spend as little money as possible; to be very frugal or tight, especially with the aim of saving up for something bigger. Ever since we had our second child, we've had to pinch and scrape to make sure they both get what they want for Christmas.
See also: and, pinch, scrape

in a scrape

In a challenging or problematic situation; in a predicament. I'm in a bit of a scrape here—I need to be at a job interview in an hour, and my car won't start.
See also: scrape

bottom of the barrel

 and bottom of the heap
Fig. the location of persons or things of the very lowest quality; someone or something of the lowest quality. (The fruit at the bottom of a barrel of apples is likely to be bruised from the weight of the other apples.) That last secretary you sent me was really the bottom of the barrel. I don't need any candidates from the bottom of the heap.
See also: barrel, bottom, of

bow and scrape

Fig. to be very humble and subservient. Please don't bow and scrape. We are all equal here. The salesclerk came in, bowing and scraping, and asked if he could help us.
See also: and, bow, scrape

have a scrape (with someone or something)

Fig. to come into contact with someone or something; to have a small battle with someone or something. I had a scrape with the county sheriff. John and Bill had a scrape, but they are friends again now.
See also: have, scrape

scare someone or something up

Rur. to search for and find someone or something. Go out in the kitchen and scare some food up. I'll see if I can scare up somebody to fix the broken chair.
See also: scare, up

scrape along (on something)

 and scrape along (with something)
to manage just to get along with a minimum amount of something. We can just scrape along on the money I earn from my sewing. Do you think you can scrape along with just $400 per month?
See also: scrape

scrape by

(on something) and scrape by (with something) to manage just to get by with something. (Usually applies to a more specific period or time or a more specific event than scrape along (on something).) There is not really enough money to live on, and we just have to scrape by on what we can earn. We can't scrape by with only that amount of money.
See also: scrape

scrape by

(something) to manage just to get by something. I scraped by the man standing at the gate and got into the theater without a ticket. Mary scraped by the cart that was blocking the crowded hallway.
See also: scrape

scrape by

(with something) Go to scrape by (on something).
See also: scrape

scrape someone or something together

 and scrape someone or something up
Fig. to find and collect something; to locate and assemble a group of people or things. (Based on scrape something up.) Fm sure we can scrape up someone for the job. Mary scraped a few dollars together for some new books. John barely scraped up enough money to pay his rent.
See also: scrape, together

scrape something away (from something)

to scratch or rasp something off something. Ted scraped the rough places away from the fender he was repairing. Ted scraped away the rough places.
See also: away, scrape

scrape something off (of) someone or something

 and scrape something off
to rub or stroke something off someone or something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) I sat down and scraped the caked mud off of me. It was everywhere! Jake scraped off the rust.
See also: off, scrape

scrape something out

to empty something by scraping. Scrape the pan out. Don't leave any of that good sauce inside. Please scrape out the pan.
See also: out, scrape

scrape something out of something

 and scrape something Out
to remove something by scraping. Scrape all the peanut butter out of the jar before you discard it. Scrape out the peanut butter.
See also: of, out, scrape

scrape something together

to gather things together by scraping. The waiter scraped all the crumbs together and removed them from the table with a little gadget. Karen scraped together all the trimmings and set them aside.
See also: scrape, together

scrape the bottom of the barrel

to select from among the worst; to choose from what is left over. You've bought a bad-looking car. You really scraped the bottom of the barrel to get that one. The worker you sent over was the worst I've ever seen. Send me anotherand don't scrape the bottom of the barrel.
See also: barrel, bottom, of, scrape

scrape through

 (something)
1. Lit. to move through something, scraping or rubbing the sides. The car, going at a very high speed, scraped through the tunnel. It just managed to scrape through.
2. Fig. to get by something just barely; to pass a test just barely. Alice passed the test, but she just scraped through it. I just scraped through my calculus test.
See also: scrape

scrimp and save

 and pinch and scrape
to be very thrifty; to live on very little money, often in order to save up for something. We had to scrimp and save in order to send the children to college. The Smiths pinched and scraped all year in order to go on a Caribbean cruise.
See also: and, save, scrimp

scare up something

to find or obtain something that is not easily available At the very least, I'm sure he'll have some original ideas on how to scare up some cash. We discovered it was impossible to scare up an audience for the game. Related vocabulary: scrape together something
See also: scare, up

scrape by

1. to have only enough money to buy the basic things you need to live Even with both of us working, we earn just enough to scrape by.
2. to come very close to failing She only scraped by in the last election and no one expects her to win this time.
See also: scrape

scrape together something

also scrape something together
to gather something that is not easily available, esp. money He managed to scrape together $20 for the train and came back home. Many immigrants have difficulty scraping enough money together for the application.
Usage notes: also in the form scrape up something: Somehow these families managed to scrape up the tuition fee.
Related vocabulary: scare up something
See also: scrape, together

bow and scrape

to try too hard to please someone in a position of authority (often in continuous tenses) It's embarrassing to see staff bowing and scraping to the new Prime Minister.
See also: and, bow, scrape

scrape the barrel

  (informal)
to use something or someone that you do not want to use because nothing or no one else is available (usually in continuous tenses) You know you're really scraping the barrel when you have to ask your old mother to come to the cinema with you.
See also: barrel, scrape

scrimp and save

to spend very little money, especially because you are saving it to buy something expensive (often + to do sth) We had to scrimp and save to buy our first house.
See also: and, save, scrimp

bottom of the barrel

The least desirable, the dregs, as in The nominating committee had trouble finding candidates; they were settling for the bottom of the barrel . The phrase often occurs in scrape the bottom of the barrel, meaning "to use the least desirable elements" (because one has no choice), as in Bringing up that minor legal point proves that you're scraping the bottom of the barrel. This metaphor for the sediment left by wine in a barrel was already used by Cicero to describe the lowest elements of Roman society. [First half of 1900s]
See also: barrel, bottom, of

bow and scrape

Behave obsequiously or too deferentially, as in In this fashionable store, the salespersons virtually bow and scrape before customers. This term alludes to the old-fashioned custom of bowing so deeply that one's foot draws back and scrapes the ground. A cliché for a century or more, it may be dying out. [Mid-1600s]
See also: and, bow, scrape

scare up

Also, scrape together or up . Assemble or produce with considerable effort, as in We managed to scare up extra chairs for the unexpectedly large audience, or He managed to scrape together enough cash to buy two more tickets. The first term alludes to scare in the sense of "flush game out of cover" and dates from the mid-1800s; the variant, alluding to scratching or clawing for something, was first recorded in 1549. Also see scrape up an acquaintance.
See also: scare, up

scrape up an acquaintance

Make an effort to become familiar with someone, especially for one's own benefit. For example, He scraped up an acquaintance with the college president in hopes of getting his son admitted . This term uses scrape in the sense of "gather with difficulty" (also see under scare up). Originally put as scrape acquaintance, it was first recorded in 1600.
See also: acquaintance, scrape, up

scrimp and save

Economize severely, spend as little as possible, as in For years we had to scrimp and save, but now we can enjoy life more. [Mid-1800s]
See also: and, save, scrimp

scare up

v.
To gather or prepare something with a lot of effort or ingenuity: They managed to scare up some folding chairs for the unexpected crowd. I'll go in the kitchen and try to scare something up from among the leftovers.
See also: scare, up

scrape along

v.
1. To succeed just barely in managing or surviving, especially despite severely limited resources: We scraped along on very little income until I could find work.
2. To succeed or manage at a level of minimal acceptability: The parents were concerned that their child was just scraping along.
See also: scrape

scrape by

v.
1. To succeed just barely in managing or surviving, especially despite severely limited resources: When I was out of work, my family and I barely scraped by. We scraped by on just $3 a day.
2. To succeed at a level of minimal acceptability: The student just scraped by with a D average.
3. To succeed just barely in passing some obstacle, such as a competition or evaluation: The tennis player scraped by the third round with a narrow victory.
See also: scrape

scrape through

v.
To succeed just barely in getting through something: I didn't get a chance to study, and I barely scraped through the final exam.
See also: scrape

scrape together

v.
To accumulate or produce something with difficulty: We scraped together just enough cash to pay for the pizza. The kitchen was so empty that we could barely scrape a meal together.
See also: scrape, together

bottom of the barrel

and bottom of the heap
n. the location of persons or things of the very lowest quality. (see also scrape the bottom of the barrel.) That last secretary you sent me was really from the bottom of the barrel. If you drop out of school, you stay at the bottom of the heap.
See also: barrel, bottom, of

scrape the bottom of the barrel

tv. to utilize the last or only things or people available, even if unsatisfactory. (see also bottom of the barrel.) They were really scraping the bottom of the barrel when they picked you.
See also: barrel, bottom, of, scrape

bow and scrape

To behave obsequiously.
See also: and, bow, scrape
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, the research showed that 1 1/2 and 2 1/2-yearold bucks rarely make scrapes, and when they do, they scrape later in the year.
Wildlife Research Center Hot Scrape Mock Scrape Kit
Mock scrapes or natural scrapes with a scrape dripper and some active scrape or estrus lure will be checked out periodically.
We don't totally understand the function of a scrape or of a rub," Kelly said.
But all that seemed to go on the back burner, as the hapless Bill proceeded to get himself into tedious scrape after tedious scrape.
Yoshimi and Hirotaka have developed a CCD image system which identifies high points to scrape by applying thin coats of marking compounds to specimen surface [2], [3].
If no asbestos danger is present, the best way to remove sticky adhesive is to scrape it off.
He also gave information during investigation about another godown full of stolen 400 ton of scrape.
PESHAWAR, March 30, 2011 (Balochistan Times): Police and government institutions had completed registration of all the scrape traders.
The T-Sensation[R] is a batch reactor that incorporates a scrape surface plate heat exchanger.
The night-shift supervisor had instructed me and my co-worker, AN Garcia, to go to the flight deck to scrape rain erosion off the leading-edge flap antenna on aircraft 207.
Then the non-stick came off so that each time I wanted breakfast I had to scrape the bacon off.
In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment, cream butter and sugar on medium speed about 5 minutes, or until light and fluffy, stopping as necessary to scrape sides and bottom of bowl.
That means any grit or sand on the rods will scrape or cut seals when the rod is extended or retracted.
It does not take many minutes to scrape the ice off, spray the glass with de-icer or even pour tepid water over the windows.