scot


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get off scot-free

To escape punishment for a crime or wrongdoing; to be acquitted of charges for a crime. Mark's wealthy senator uncle influenced the jury, and he ended up getting off scot-free. My younger sister caused endless trouble as a child, but because she was the baby of the house, she usually got off scot-free.
See also: get, off

go scot-free

To escape punishment for a crime or wrongdoing; to be acquitted of charges for a crime. Mark's wealthy senator uncle influenced the jury, and he ended up going scot-free. My younger sister caused endless trouble as a child, but because she was the baby of the house, she usually went scot-free.

walk away scot-free

To escape from some predicament, accusation, or wrongdoing without incurring any penalty or punishment; to be acquitted of all charges for some crime or crimes. It sickens me that all these bankers who ruined our economy get to walk away scot-free, while millions of people have suffered as a result. Due to an error in the filing of evidence by police, the suspect ended up walking away scot-free.
See also: away, walk

get away scot-free

To escape from some predicament, accusation, or wrongdoing without incurring any penalty or punishment; to be acquitted of all charges for some crime or crimes. It sickens me that all these bankers that ruined our economy get away scot-free, even though they caused millions of people to suffer. Due to an error in the filing of evidence by police, the suspect ending up getting away scot-free.
See also: away, get

get off

1. To physically climb off of or disembark from something. We're in the last row, so it’s going to take us awhile to get off the plane. Get off that ladder before you fall and hurt yourself! Get off the couch and start helping me already.
2. To remove someone or something from some surface. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "get" and "off." Hey, get your feet off the table! Can you get your stuff off my bed?
3. To depart. When do you guys get off on your trip?
4. To shoot ammunition. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "get" and "off." I could only get off one shot before the burglars fled.
5. In sports, to successfully complete an action, such as a shot or pass, before time expires or contact is made. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "get" and "off." I'm not sure he got off that shot before the buzzer went off. It will be difficult for him to get a pass off with all of this defensive pressure.
6. To send something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "get" and "off." Have you gotten off that email yet? If not, I have a few more lines to add.
7. To physically remove something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "get" and "off." I just can't seem to get this sticky stuff off the floor. Get off those wet clothes before you catch cold!
8. To receive a less severe punishment or avoid punishment altogether. I can't believe that known criminal got off with such a light sentence. You're only grounded for a week? You got off easy if you ask me. As a prosecutor, I know what it's like when someone who I know is guilty gets off.
9. To cause someone to receive a less severe punishment or avoid punishment altogether. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "get" and "off." Do you really think you can get this guy off with a lighter sentence?
10. To finish one's workday. I get off today at three, so I'll stop by on my way home.
11. To stop bothering or nagging someone. Get off my back, will you? I'm working as fast as I can!
12. To be so bold as to do something. She's not my boss, so where does she get off assigning me yet another project?
13. slang To be or become particularly excited by or enthusiastic about something, especially in, or likened to, a sexual manner. Can be considered vulgar. It seems like Kaya gets off on the power of her new corporate management role. I don't know why you get off on going to the gym every day—it just seems like a chore to me!
14. slang To have an amorous or sexual encounter with someone. Primarily heard in UK. We weren't at the party for more than 30 minutes when Jake got off with some guy he'd just met. I heard Janet got off with one of her co-workers.
15. vulgar slang To experience orgasm.
16. vulgar slang To cause one to experience orgasm. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "get" and "off."
See also: get, off

get off

 
1. to start off (on a friendship). Tom and Bill had never met before. They seemed to get off all right, though. I'm glad they got off so well.
2. to leave; to depart. What time did they get off? We have to get off early in the morning before the traffic gets heavy.
3. Go to get off (easy); get off (of) someone or something; get off (of) something; get off something; get off to something; get off with something.
See also: get, off

get off (easy)

 and get off (lightly)
to receive very little punishment (for doing something wrong). It was a serious crime, but Mary got off easy. Billy's punishment was very light. Considering what he did, he got off lightly.
See also: get, off

get off (with something)

to receive only a light punishment for something. Let's hope John gets off with a light sentence. Max got off with only a few years in prison.
See also: get, off

get off

(of) someone or something and get off to get down from someone or something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Please get off of me. I can't play piggyback anymore. Get off of the sofa!
See also: get, off

get off

(of) something and get off Inf. to stop discussing the topic that one is supposed to be discussing [and start discussing something else]; to stray from the topic at hand. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) I wish you wouldn't get off the subject so much. This writer gets off of his topic all the time.
See also: get, off

get off

(something) to climb down from something. Please get off the stairs. You know you shouldn't play on the stairs. I wish that the children would get off that ladder before they fall off.
See also: get, off

get off

(to something) to leave for something. I've got to get off to my violin lesson. We have to get off to the hospital immediately!
See also: get, off

get off (with something)

to receive only a light punishment for something. Let's hope John gets off with a light sentence. Max got off with only a few years in prison.
See also: get, off

get someone off

 
1. to get someone cleared of a criminal charge. Ted's lawyer got him off, although we all knew he was guilty. I hope someone can get her off. She is innocent no matter how it looks.
2. to get someone freed from a responsibility. (See also get off the hook.) I think I can get you off. What do I need to do to get myself off?
See also: get, off

get someone or something off someone or something

 and get someone or something off
to remove someone or something from someone, oneself, or something. Come in and get those wet clothes off. Get him off of me!
See also: get, off

get something off (to someone or something)

 and get something off
to send something to someone or something. I have to get a letter off to Aunt Mary. Did you get off all your packages?
See also: get, off

go scot-free

 and get off scot-free
to go unpunished; to be acquitted of a crime. (This scot is an old word meaning "tax" or "tax burden.") The thief went scot-free. Jane cheated on the test and got caught, but she got off scot-free.

get off

1. Dismount, leave a vehicle, as in She got off the horse right away, or Let's get off the train at the next stop. [Late 1600s]
2. Start, as on a trip; leave. For example, We got off at the crack of dawn. [Mid-1700s]
3. Fire a round of ammunition; also, send away. For example, He got off two shots, but the deer fled, or I got off that letter just in time.
4. Escape from punishment; also, obtain a lesser penalty or release for someone. For example, He apologized so profusely that he was sure to get off, or The attorney got her client off with a slap on the wrist. This sense is sometimes amplified to get off easy or get off lightly. Where there is no punishment at all, the expression is sometimes put as get off scot-free, originally meaning "be free from paying a fine or tax ( scot)," dating from the 1500s. [Mid-1600s]
5. Remove, take off, as in I can't seem to get this paint off the car. [Second half of 1600s]
6. Succeed in uttering, especially a joke. For example, Carl always manages to get off a good one before he gets serious. [Mid-1800s]
7. Have the effrontery to do or say something. For example, Where does he get off telling me what to do? [Colloquial; early 1900s]
8. Experience orgasm, as in She never did get off. [Slang; first half of 1900s]
9. Also, get off of one. Stop bothering or criticizing one, as in Get off me right now! or If you don't get off of me I'm walking out. [Slang; c. 1940] Also see get off on; off one's back.
See also: get, off

get off/go ˌscot-ˈfree

(informal) escape from a situation without receiving the punishment you deserve: It seemed so unfair that she was punished while the others got off scot-free!This idiom comes from the old English word sceot, meaning a ‘tax’. People were scot-free if they didn’t have to pay the tax.
See also: get, off

get off

v.
1. To remove oneself from something that supports, carries, or holds: I got off my chair and ran down the hall. After we got off the plane, we picked up our baggage. Get off the couch!
2. To remove something from a supporting, carrying, or holding thing: Get the cat off the table!
3. To start, as on a trip; leave. It took so long to pack that we didn't get off until noon.
4. To send something; transmit something: I'll get a letter off to you next week.
5. To cause something to be emitted, as when firing a weapon: The hunter got off two shots before the deer disappeared. The archer got three arrows off before hitting the bull's-eye.
6. To escape, as from punishment or danger: They thought the judge would sentence them harshly, but somehow they got off.
7. To obtain a release or lesser penalty for someone: The attorney got her client off with just a small fine.
8. To get permission to leave one's workplace: The sales crew got off early and went out for a walk.
9. Slang To stop pressuring, pestering, or domineering someone: The boss thought the employees were lazy and didn't get off them the whole day. Get off me!—I can't work with you watching over me.
10. Slang To feel great pleasure or gratification from something: They really got off on that roller coaster ride at the amusement park. I don't really get off on photography.
11. Slang To cause someone to feel great pleasure or gratification; satisfy someone: That movie really didn't get me off.
12. Vulgar Slang To achieve orgasm.
13. Vulgar Slang To cause someone to achieve orgasm.
See also: get, off

get off

verb
See also: get, off

pay scot and lot

To pay in full.
See also: and, lot, pay, scot
References in periodicals archive ?
In Kent, Scot suggests, the protection of the poor extended beyond the traditional beneficence of hospitality and alms, incorporating a 'speciall care for the supporting of their right, and redressing of their wrongs' by those that neither despise 'their calamity' nor forget 'their complaint', but seek 'all means for their amendment, and for the reformation of their disorder' (Scot, 1584: Ar).
The best mass education system in the world let the Scots use the talents of a larger fraction of the small population than any other European country.
Mike: Scot, the ability to make a QSSS election at any time during the year provides tremendous flexibility.
The friend, who fears for his own safety, told the Daily Telegraph: "I do not believe for one minute Scot committed suicide, my heart tells me he was killed.
But it's the Greenaway movie, the first of a planned trilogy, which Scot reckons ``will be like Star Wars and eventually become the stuff of conventions''.
The Scots remained dominant in Glengarry; the French, still dominant in Windsor, had also moved into Ottawa (Bytown) and Penetanguishene from Drummond Island; and the predominant Irish settled in the central area of Upper Canada.
We had samba dancing, food tasting, scots reading, art in Spanish, magnificent music, table tennis and Chinese greetings, making incredible tartan bunting and watching films in different languages.
The Council of Europe: European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages, recognised Scots as a minority language in 2000 and the UK Government ratified Scots as such in 2001 under Part II of the Charter.
Presented by Fons Scotiae, a publisher of educational and restored Scots prose, this text provides a reference to aid in re-establishing spelling conventions among contemporary users of Scots, the language of Lowland Scotland.
REGARDING the article indicating it is possible that our fusiliers are to be sacrificed in order to keep the Scots on board before the oncoming elections that they are holding to vote for independence.
ON Sunday July 27, the Merseyside branch of the Scots Guards Association will be unveiling a commemorative plaque in St John's Gardens (behind St George's Hall) at 12.
NOW that David Cameron has apologised to the Scots for implementing the poll tax one year earlier in Scotland than in England, can we English now expect an apology from the Scots Tony Blair and Gordon Brown for the following anti-English legislations?
But a 1996 EU study of Ulster- Scots could not find a single speaker in Antrim or Down.
Long dismissed as rednecks, crackers, and hillbillies, the Scots-Irish--also known as Scotch-Irish, Ulster Scots, or Borderers, because they hailed from Northern Ireland and the border counties of Scotland and England--have provided a disproportionate share of America's political leaders, military brass, writers, and musicians.