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Halloween Scare On The Ellen DeGeneres Show: TV Host Scares Celebrity Guest Jake Gyllenhaal With Male Staff Dressed As 'Annabelle' Doll [VIDEO] - [(http://au.
Food scares are merely a combination of the stupidity of politicians and the excitability of the media, which sets off hysteria.
Americans lost $13,863,003 to Internet scares in 2005.
Smith argues that although the Red Scare and McCarthyism ruined the lives of many black and white Americans, none has been as thoroughly erased as Canada Lee.
Mathematicians Chris Bauch and David Earn, from the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada, used 'game theory' to analyse what happened in the aftermath of a vaccine scare.
In addition, personal alarms are considerably louder than medical-grade, anti-fall monitors because they are designed to scare away a would be perpetrator.
CONSUMERS lose millions of dollars each year to scares and frauds.
Earlton Airport manager Dalton Potter says Air North experienced a 60-per-cent decline in business during the buildup to the Iraq war and at the height of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) scare in Toronto.
Yet, because of the localistic nature of American public education, older and newer approaches often coexisted, cheek by jowl, in FLE curricula, and graphic illustrations of the effects o f venereal disease, Moran suggests, acted more than the prospect of fulfilling marriages to scare teenagers into chastity.
The anthrax contamination of some post offices and media and government mailing rooms, coupled with the media-fed scare of a possible further spread of the bacteria, has newsletter marketers responding in varying degrees of panic, resolve, confusion, and ingenuity.
AILING soccer legend George Best suffered a heart scare in his hospital bed, the Sunday People can reveal.
As I was admiring the entries in the parts competition, I overhead another visitor say, "These parts should scare the hell out of injection molders
What scares Joy, and should scare all of us, is that these technologies do not require exotic materials--they are "knowledge based"--and that they are self-replicating.
Indeed in the mid-'60s there was a such a "population" scare that reputable journals bought panic stories about how the world would be without essential natural resources within a matter of years, or within decade or two.
The largely parochial, academic context of the Sokal hoax, with its almost paranoiac fixation on academic "culture," a continuation of the culture wars by other means, bears little initial resemblance to the national and international implications of the BSE scare (e.