saw wood

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saw wood

1. To snore very loudly or intensely, as during a deep sleep. Once I found out my boyfriend sawed wood at night, I knew I had to break up with him. Jake, roll over on your side, you're sawing wood again!
2. By extension, to sleep soundly. I was so exhausted after that hike that I was sawing wood in no time in my tent.
See also: saw, wood
References in periodicals archive ?
Other activities teachers have organised include outdoor team sports, lighting fires, sawing wood, building dens and looking for bugs.
It might be a few people with a portable sawmill sawing wood for boat builders.
Richard van As, a carpenter from South Africa who lost four fingers while sawing wood, teamed with Ivan Owen, a mechanical special-effects artist from Washington state, to develop a mechanical finger in 2011.
This installment takes the Monkey out of the jungle and into a busy workshop environment, with lively interactions like hammering nails, sawing wood, drilling bolts, and fixing toy cars.
Windmills were used for sawing wood in towns and grinding corn in the country, among other uses.
If you go there, you can still find a few old men hewing and sawing wood or hammering and nailing planks together to slowly and painstakingly create traditional boats known in the GCC countries as dhows.
Campground Road, larceny reported, woman moved in the fall and numerous items are missing from the detached cellar; There is no access from the residence; sawdust found, indicating someone has been sawing wood.
WHEN retired fireman Stuart Frain accidentally lopped off his arm while sawing wood, he managed to keep calm - and that saved his life.
I realised that the right had turned green when I was sawing wood.
Easy sawing - sawing wood can be exhausting work and frustrating when the blade keeps sticking.
Wintersteiger says the DSB twinhead thin-cutting bandsaw is ideal for sawing wood blocks into lamellas for engineered floors, doors, multilayer boards and other uses.
The poem is deeply significant; according to Jum'a Kareem from the Antiquities department, the use of hydraulic power for grain milling is well known however "archeological remains that could be attributed to such an early use of waterpower for sawing wood or stone, had until now been entirely unknown".
Hrabluik's projected video Rossendale, 2006, incorporates stop-motion animation of a man performing menial farm tasks, such as pitching hay, sawing wood, drawing liquid fuel from a barrel, and tinkering in a workshop.