salute

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run something up

 
1. Lit. to raise or hoist something, such as a flag. Harry ran the flag up the flagpole each morning. Will you please run up the flag today?
2. Fig. to cause something to go higher, such as the price of stocks or commodities. A rumor about higher earnings ran the price of the computer stocks up early in the afternoon. They ran up the price too high.
3. Fig. to accumulate indebtedness. I ran up a huge phone bill last month. Walter ran up a bar bill at the hotel that made his boss angry.
4. to stitch something together quickly. She's very clever. I'm sure she can run up a costume for you. The seamstress ran up a party dress in one afternoon.
See also: run, up

run up (to someone or something)

to run as far as someone or something and stop; to run to the front of someone or something. I ran up to the mailman and said hello to him. I ran up and said hello.
See also: run, up

salute someone with something

 
1. Lit. to greet someone with a formal hand salute. He failed to salute the officer with the proper salute and was reprimanded. David saluted the captain with the appropriate salute and passed on by.
2. Fig. to greet or honor someone with the firing of guns or an over flight of airplanes. (Military or government.) The government saluted the visiting dignitary with a twenty-one gun salute. They saluted the prime minister with a flight of acrobatic jets.
See also: salute

run up something

to cause something to reach a high level or large amount Carol ran up a huge phone bill last month, calling the UK and Mexico.
See also: run, up

run up

1. Make or become greater or larger, as in That offer will run up the price of the stock. [Late 1500s]
2. Accumulate, as in She ran up huge bills at the florist. [First half of 1700s]
3. Sew rapidly, as in I can run up some new curtains for the kitchen. [Mid-1800s]
4. Raise a flag, as in Let's run up the flag in time for the holiday. This usage, originating in the navy about 1900, gave rise to the slangy phrase, Let's run it up the flagpole and see if anybody salutes, meaning, "Let's try this out." The latter originated about 1960 as advertising jargon.
See also: run, up

run up

v.
1. To cause some debt to accumulate: Don't run up such a big bill next time you go out to eat! He has been running a large debt up for months.
2. To increase some value: The craze for this company's stock will run up its price. The bidders ran the price up to $100.
See also: run, up

one-finger salute

and OFS
phr. & comp. abb. the finger; the digitus impudicus. And an OFS to you, sir.
See also: salute

a three-finger salute

and TFS
n. & comp. abb. The keyboard keys Control, Alternate, Delete pressed at the same time when a program fails under the Windows operating system. (This is a play on one-finger salute, the digitus impudicus.) I had to give the TFS twice before the program would run.
See also: salute
References in periodicals archive ?
Twelve months earlier, Saluter collected a $100,000 bonus, having already won the Virginia Gold Cup.
Saluter achieved the double in 1997 but fell at the third-last 12 months ago when the Richard Johnson-ridden Symbol Of Success ran out a comfortable winner.
Saluter was well behind for much of the four miles but passed three horses in the home straight to win by three lengths.
Runner-up Gold Quoit could now join Saluter in the transatlantic bid, and it is hoped that the owners of this year's Maryland Hunt Cup winner, Welter Weight, can also be persuaded to run their horse.
They are of a bigger mold than mere saluters of the flag.