sad

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a sad state (of affairs)

A particularly unfortunate, unpleasant, and/or upsetting situation or set of circumstances. Their company has been in a sad state after Jonathan took over. It's a sad state of affairs when you can no longer be sure how you're going to feed your children each night.
See also: sad, state

disappointed at someone or something

 and disappointed in someone or something
becoming sad because of someone or something. I am really disappointed at what you did. I am very disappointed in you. That was a terrible thing to do. They were disappointed in the outcome.
See also: disappointed

It is a poor heart that never rejoices.

 and It is a sad heart that never rejoices.
Prov. Even a habitually sad person cannot be sad all the time. (Sometimes used to indicate that a habitually sad person is happy about something.) Jill: I've never seen Sam smile before, but today, at his retirement party, he smiled. Jane: It is a poor heart that never rejoices.
See also: heart, never, poor, rejoice

sadder but wiser

Cliché unhappy but knowledgeable [about someone or something--after an unpleasant event]. After the accident, I was sadder but wiser, and would never make the same mistake again. We left the meeting sadder but wiser, knowing that we could not ever come to an agreement with Becky's aunt.
See also: but, sad, wiser

sorry sight

 and sad sight
a sight that one regrets seeing; someone or something that is unpleasant to look at. Well, aren't you a sorry sight! Go get cleaned up and put on some fresh clothes.
See also: sight, sorry

sorry to say

also sad to say
I regret telling you this Sorry to say, the violin was never found.
See also: say, sorry

a sad state of affairs

(spoken) also a sorry state of affairs
a bad situation that you find upsetting It's a sad state of affairs when schools don't provide a basic education for their students.
Usage notes: sometimes used in the form a sad state: Things have reached a sad state when you have to pay a bribe to get something done.
See also: affair, of, sad, state

sadder but wiser

if someone is sadder but wiser after a bad experience, they have suffered but they have also learned something from it He bought a second-hand car and ended up sadder but wiser after a series of breakdowns and expensive repairs.
See also: but, sad, wiser

sadder but wiser

Unhappy but having learned from one's mistakes, as in Sadder but wiser, she's never going near poison ivy again. The pairing of these two adjectives was first recorded in Samuel Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798).
See also: but, sad, wiser

sad sack

A singularly inept person, as in Poor George is a hopeless sad sack. This term alludes to a cartoon character, Sad Sack, invented by George Baker in 1942 and representing a soldier in ill-fitting uniform who failed at whatever he tried to do. It was soon transferred to clumsily inept civilians.
See also: sack, sad

sad

mod. poor; undesirable. This steak is really sad.

sad sack

n. a sad person; a listless or depressed person. Tom always looks like such a sad sack.
See also: sack, sad
References in classic literature ?
You are mistaken, mademoiselle; no, it is not sadness I experience.
At other times, incited by such sadness, images of Skipper and Mister Haggin would throng his mind; images, too, of Terrence, and Biddy, and Michael, and the rest of the long-vanished life at Meringe Plantation.
Wander with me through one mood of the myriad moods of sadness into which one is plunged by John Barleycorn.
Could they bow down in prayer, and when all Heaven turned to hear them, bring the dark shade of sadness on one angel's face?
Pardon me, dear madam,' said she, laughingly throwing herself into my arms, and kissing me with playful affection; but I felt a tear on my neck, as she dropped her head on my bosom and continued, with an odd mixture of sadness and levity, timidity and audacity, - 'I know you are not so happy as I mean to be, for you spend half your life alone at Grassdale, while Mr.
No," Wolf Larsen answered, with an indescribable air of sadness.
I understood but too well the change in her manner, to greater kindness and quicker readiness in interpreting all my wishes, before others--to constraint and sadness, and nervous anxiety to absorb herself in the first occupation she could seize on, whenever we happened to be left together alone.
From the moment she opens her eyes, Riley's mood is shaped by five coloured emotions - golden Joy (Amy Poehler), blue Sadness (Phyllis Smith), purple Fear (Bill Hader), red Anger (Lewis Black) and green Disgust (Mindy Kaling) - which bicker behind a large control desk laden with buttons and levers inside the child's head.
The results of two studies indicate that feeling sadness may actually change how we perceive color.
Enter Joy, Sadness, Anger, Disgust, and Fear, the personification of emotions who run Headquarters in Riley's head.
In our era, we attempt to ban sadness and, to our peril, disregard the bad things that happen when a necessary emotion is scorned and punished.
Anger is red, Disgust dark green, Joy glowing and smiley, Fear mauve and Sadness blue.
But it's told from the perspective of her emotions, brought to life inside her head as the characters Joy, Sadness, Anger, Fear and Disgust, who battle it out to control her feelings.
Traumatic events such as a first day at a new school nudge Sadness to the fore.
Following an altercation, rivals Joy and Sadness are expelled from Headquarters and find themselves stranded in the labyrinth of Riley's long-term memories.