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be tall in (one's)/the saddle

To be or remain proud, stoical, or august in one's manner or composure. Even after two years of a losing war, the general was still tall in his saddle before his troops. I'll have nothing to do with your schemes or plot. One day, you're going to be locked up and lose everything, and I'll be tall in the saddle when you do.
See also: saddle, tall

ride tall in the/(one's) saddle

To be or remain proud, stoical, or august in one's manner or composure. Even after two years of a losing war, the general still rode tall in his saddle before his troops. I'll have nothing to do with your schemes or plot. One day, you're going to be locked up and lose everything, and I'll be riding tall in the saddle when you do.
See also: ride, saddle, tall

sit tall in the/(one's) saddle

To be or remain proud, stoical, or august in one's manner or composure. Even after two years of a losing war, the general still sat tall in his saddle before his troops. I'll have nothing to do with your schemes or plot. One day, you're going to be locked up and lose everything, and I'll be sitting tall in the saddle when you do.
See also: saddle, sit, tall

saddle tramp

1. A cowboy, particularly one who lives a nomadic lifestyle. Primarily heard in US. You can't trust him—he's just a saddle tramp who roams from town to town!
2. One who rides on horseback. Primarily heard in US. A: "I hear hoofbeats." B: "Yes, there's a saddle tramp approaching in the distance."
See also: saddle, tramp

have a burr under one's saddle

Rur. to be irritated by something. Joe has a burr under his saddle because Jane's going out with Bill tonight. Mary must have a burr under her saddle. She's been snapping at me all day.
See also: have, saddle

in the driver's seat

Fig. in control; in charge of things. (As if one were driving and controlling the vehicle.) Now that Fred is in the driver's seat, there is a lot less criticism about how things are being done. Joan can't wait to get into the driver's seat and do what she can to turn things around.
See also: seat

look like a saddle on a sow

Rur. to look ridiculous and out of place. Tom: How do you like my new diamond earring? Jane: It looks like a saddle on a sow. The fancy wheels on that beat-up old car look like a saddle on a sow.
See also: like, look, on, saddle, sow

saddle an animal up

to put a saddle on a horse or some other beast of burden. Please saddle my horse up. I have to leave. Would you saddle up my horse for me?
See also: animal, saddle, up

saddle someone with someone or something

Fig. to burden someone with someone or something undesirable, annoying, or difficult to deal with. I apologize for saddling you with my young cousin all day. I didn't mean to saddle you with my problems.
See also: saddle

saddle up

 
1. Lit. to prepare one's horse for riding by putting a saddle on it. Let's saddle up and go for a ride.
2. Fig. to mount one's horse and sit in the saddle. The cowboys saddled up and took off after the rustlers.
See also: saddle, up

saddled with someone or something

Fig. burdened with someone or something. I've been saddled with the children all day. Let's go out tonight. I don't want to be saddled with your work.
See also: saddle

back in the saddle

doing something you stopped doing for a period of time Friedman's career seemed to be finished a month ago, but he's back in the saddle and playing for Houston.
See also: back, saddle

in the saddle

in control It looks like those who oppose environmental controls are going to be in the saddle.
Related vocabulary: in the driver's seat
Etymology: based on the idea that someone who is in the saddle (seat fastened on the back of a horse) controls the horse's movements
See also: saddle

saddle somebody/something with something

to give someone or something a difficult responsibility Student aid often comes as loans, which can saddle students with debt for years. I hope I'm not going to be saddled with all the cooking on this vacation. The company was saddled with many lawsuits.
See also: saddle

in the driver's seat

in control of a situation Huge consumer demand for electricity has put energy companies in the driver's seat.
Related vocabulary: in the saddle
See also: seat

be in the saddle

to be in control of a situation With a new leader firmly in the saddle the party looks set for victory at the next election.
See also: saddle

in the driver's seat

Also, in the saddle. In control, in a position of authority. For example, With the boss on vacation, Mr. Burns was in the driver's seat and enjoying it, or She waited until after the election, knowing that she'd be in the saddle then. The first expression dates from the 1800s, the second from the early 1600s. Also see at the helm.
See also: seat

saddle someone with

Burden someone with, as in Before he left on vacation, he saddled his assistant with many tasks he hadn't time to do himself . [Late 1600s]
See also: saddle

saddle up

v.
1. To put a saddle on a horse: The cowboys saddled up and rode off.
2. To put a saddle on some animal: The cowboy saddled up three horses for the other riders. Some camels don't like it if you saddle them up at night.
See also: saddle, up

saddle with

v.
To load or burden someone or something; weigh down someone or something: My boss saddled me with a large amount of work. The recent college graduate was saddled with debt.
See also: saddle

saddled with someone or something

mod. burdened with someone or something. I’ve been saddled with the children all day. Let’s go out tonight.
See also: saddle

tall in the saddle

mod. proud. (Often with sit.) I’ll still be tall in the saddle when you are experiencing the results of your folly.
See also: saddle, tall

in the saddle

1. Prevailing or in control; dominant: "The crisis [in Russia] came to a head when the American-backed reformers were in the saddle" (Michael R. Gordon).
2. Engaged in an activity, especially a job: back in the saddle after a leave of absence from work.
See also: saddle
References in classic literature ?
He showed the reaction he was undergoing, when he swung down out of the saddle.
The saddle and saddle-cloth were innocent of bur or sticker; the back was smooth and unbroken.
My friend trudges behind them, with the saddle and the cloak.
Some dismounted, while others remained in the saddle as an earnest that their stay would be short.
A rifle cracked, and a second, but he was going fast, leaning forward, low in the saddle, one hand clutching the shirt of apples, the other guiding the horse.
And then he heard it, the last thing he was to hear, for he was dead ere he hit the ground in the long crashing fall from the saddle.
But you've got a bee-hive--or something like one--fastened to the saddle,' said Alice.
And he hung it to the saddle, which was already loaded with bunches of carrots, and fire-irons, and many other things.
he asked, as he scrambled back into the saddle, keeping hold of Alice's hair with one hand, to save himself from falling over on the other side.
The Knight looked down proudly at his helmet, which hung from the saddle.
He raised his hands in some excitement as he said this, and instantly rolled out of the saddle, and fell headlong into a deep ditch.
Vronsky had not had time to look at the saddle, about which he had to give some direction, when the competitors were summoned to the pavilion to receive their numbers and places in the row at starting.
A little light hussar in tight riding breeches rode off at a gallop, crouched up like a cat on the saddle, in imitation of English jockeys.
Before the mare had time to move, Vronsky stepped with an agile, vigorous movement into the steel-toothed stirrup, and lightly and firmly seated himself on the creaking leather of the saddle.
The walls were decorated with several hunting-whips, two or three bridles, a saddle, and an old rusty blunderbuss, with an inscription below it, intimating that it was 'Loaded'--as it had been, on the same authority, for half a century at least.