saddle

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Related to saddled: cantle

be tall in (one's)/the saddle

To be or remain proud, stoical, or august in one's manner or composure. Even after two years of a losing war, the general was still tall in his saddle before his troops. I'll have nothing to do with your schemes or plot. One day, you're going to be locked up and lose everything, and I'll be tall in the saddle when you do.
See also: saddle, tall

ride tall in the/(one's) saddle

To be or remain proud, stoical, or august in one's manner or composure. Even after two years of a losing war, the general still rode tall in his saddle before his troops. I'll have nothing to do with your schemes or plot. One day, you're going to be locked up and lose everything, and I'll be riding tall in the saddle when you do.
See also: ride, saddle, tall

sit tall in the/(one's) saddle

To be or remain proud, stoical, or august in one's manner or composure. Even after two years of a losing war, the general still sat tall in his saddle before his troops. I'll have nothing to do with your schemes or plot. One day, you're going to be locked up and lose everything, and I'll be sitting tall in the saddle when you do.
See also: saddle, sit, tall

saddle tramp

1. A cowboy, particularly one who lives a nomadic lifestyle. Primarily heard in US. You can't trust him—he's just a saddle tramp who roams from town to town!
2. One who rides on horseback. Primarily heard in US. A: "I hear hoofbeats." B: "Yes, there's a saddle tramp approaching in the distance."
See also: saddle, tramp

back in the saddle

Resuming something after an absence. Despite the presence of "saddle," this phrase is rarely used in reference to riding horses. I needed to take a break for a bit, but now, I'm back in the saddle. You've mourned long enough—it's time to get back in the saddle and date again.
See also: back, saddle

be in the saddle

To be in control of a situation; to be in a position of power. Make sure to get good grades now, so that you're in the saddle when it comes time to choose a college. We're still leading in the polls, so nobody panic—we're in the saddle here.
See also: saddle

tall in the saddle

Proud, stoic, or august in one's manner or composure. Even after two years of a losing war, the general still rode tall in his saddle before his troops.
See also: saddle, tall

in the saddle

1. In control; in a dominant or influential position. With the new CEO in the saddle, the company has turned in its most profitable quarter in years.
2. Having resumed a previous activity, especially after illness or injury. I need to take today off to deal with this cold, but I should be back in the saddle on Monday.
See also: saddle

saddle (one) with (someone or something)

To force someone to deal with someone or something that proves to be a great burden. Why do you always saddle yourself with so much school work? Take fewer classes and enjoy yourself a little! The boss has saddled me with a new intern from the local college. The economic crash has saddled millions of people with debts they'll likely never pay off.
See also: saddle

have a burr under one's saddle

Rur. to be irritated by something. Joe has a burr under his saddle because Jane's going out with Bill tonight. Mary must have a burr under her saddle. She's been snapping at me all day.
See also: burr, have, saddle

in the driver's seat

Fig. in control; in charge of things. (As if one were driving and controlling the vehicle.) Now that Fred is in the driver's seat, there is a lot less criticism about how things are being done. Joan can't wait to get into the driver's seat and do what she can to turn things around.
See also: seat

look like a saddle on a sow

Rur. to look ridiculous and out of place. Tom: How do you like my new diamond earring? Jane: It looks like a saddle on a sow. The fancy wheels on that beat-up old car look like a saddle on a sow.
See also: like, look, on, saddle, sow

saddle an animal up

to put a saddle on a horse or some other beast of burden. Please saddle my horse up. I have to leave. Would you saddle up my horse for me?
See also: animal, saddle, up

saddle someone with someone or something

Fig. to burden someone with someone or something undesirable, annoying, or difficult to deal with. I apologize for saddling you with my young cousin all day. I didn't mean to saddle you with my problems.
See also: saddle

saddle up

 
1. Lit. to prepare one's horse for riding by putting a saddle on it. Let's saddle up and go for a ride.
2. Fig. to mount one's horse and sit in the saddle. The cowboys saddled up and took off after the rustlers.
See also: saddle, up

saddled with someone or something

Fig. burdened with someone or something. I've been saddled with the children all day. Let's go out tonight. I don't want to be saddled with your work.
See also: saddle

in the driver's seat

Also, in the saddle. In control, in a position of authority. For example, With the boss on vacation, Mr. Burns was in the driver's seat and enjoying it, or She waited until after the election, knowing that she'd be in the saddle then. The first expression dates from the 1800s, the second from the early 1600s. Also see at the helm.
See also: seat

saddle someone with

Burden someone with, as in Before he left on vacation, he saddled his assistant with many tasks he hadn't time to do himself . [Late 1600s]
See also: saddle

be riding high in the saddle

If a person or team is riding high in the saddle, they are experiencing great success and are therefore feeling confident. The Australian cricket team are riding high in the saddle after their first Test victory.
See also: high, riding, saddle

in the saddle

If someone is in the saddle, they are in control of an organization. Now that he is firmly in the saddle, Vaghela will be looking to strengthen his position further. Their plan would sell 55 per cent of the new stock to the company's majority shareholders, putting them in the saddle.
See also: saddle

tall in the saddle

AMERICAN
If someone is tall in the saddle, they are confident and successful. The England manager will be riding tall in the saddle as he heads for Europe. The old cowboy of French politics is sitting tall in the saddle again.
See also: saddle, tall

a burr under (or in) your saddle

a persistent source of irritation. North American informal
See also: burr, saddle

in the driver's (or driving) seat

in charge of a situation.
1998 Times The deal would propel the no-nonsense Lancastrian into the driving seat at the UK's biggest generator.
See also: seat

in the saddle

1 on horseback. 2 in a position of control or responsibility.
See also: saddle

be in the ˈsaddle

be in a position of responsibility and control in an organization: It’s too early to say if she is a good manager. She hasn’t been in the saddle for very long.
In horse riding the saddle is the leather seat for the rider.
See also: saddle

saddle up

v.
1. To put a saddle on a horse: The cowboys saddled up and rode off.
2. To put a saddle on some animal: The cowboy saddled up three horses for the other riders. Some camels don't like it if you saddle them up at night.
See also: saddle, up

saddle with

v.
To load or burden someone or something; weigh down someone or something: My boss saddled me with a large amount of work. The recent college graduate was saddled with debt.
See also: saddle

saddled with someone or something

mod. burdened with someone or something. I’ve been saddled with the children all day. Let’s go out tonight.
See also: saddle, something

tall in the saddle

mod. proud. (Often with sit.) I’ll still be tall in the saddle when you are experiencing the results of your folly.
See also: saddle, tall

in the saddle

1. Prevailing or in control; dominant: "The crisis [in Russia] came to a head when the American-backed reformers were in the saddle" (Michael R. Gordon).
2. Engaged in an activity, especially a job: back in the saddle after a leave of absence from work.
See also: saddle
References in periodicals archive ?
15) Ann Hamilton has saddled only four runners in handicap chases at Ayr over the last four seasons, but three of them won.
I got by with hiking boots, although the cowboy who saddled my horse was dubious.
Willie Muir has saddled two runners in 3yo handicaps at Brighton this season and both have won (100% for a profit of pounds 9.
McPeek, a 39-year-old Arkansan who began his racetrack career the day after he graduated from the University of Kentucky, saddled Tejano Run for that colt's second-place finish to Thunder Gulch in the 1995 Derby.
Ron McAnally saddled the winner for owners Bob and Beverly Lewis, who have given five horses to the Hall of Fame trainer.
In the past 14 days Pipe has saddled 10 winners, at a strike-rate of 30 per cent, with another eight placed runners.
Today, he was absolutely perfect to saddle, completely relaxed, and I told Terry in the paddock, `I just saddled the winner,' '' Duncan said.