run foul of (someone or something)

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run foul of (someone or something)

To be in severe disagreement, trouble, or difficulty with someone or something; to be at odds with someone or something, especially due to disobeying rules or laws. Always look into the laws of any place you visit, or you may end up unwittingly running foul of the local police. Ms. Banks has run foul of this university for the last time. She is no longer welcome here!
See also: foul, of, run

run foul of

come into conflict with; go against.
This expression is nautical in origin: when used of a ship it means ‘collide or become entangled with an obstacle or another vessel’. Both literal and figurative uses were current by the late 17th century.
See also: foul, of, run
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result, NRW fears it risks running foul of the EU Habitats Directive, as many of Wales' salmon rivers have SAC status.
But every time they run a slanderous article running foul of journalistic values, they deal a blow to their credibility, which is a precious asset in our profession.
Muscat: Many small-time grocers and retailers in the Sultanate who have long tended to give short shrift to basic consumer rights and fair trading practices now find themselves running foul of Oman's tough Consumer Protection regulations.
Fear of running foul of the ICC will serve as a restraint.
Outside the park, companies are coming up with novel ways to piggyback on the Games without running foul of a 2006 British law that tightened protection for Olympic sponsors and has the clout to issue fines of a hefty $30,000.
a seaside Continually running foul of the irascible head surgeon Sir Lancelot Spratt, Sparrow's social life is spiced up when he is taken under the wings of two student repeaters, in the form of Tony Grimsdyke and John Evans, to farcical consequences.
Then there were the accidents -- British banks took a huge hit after running foul of the regulators on sales of Payment Protection Insurance (PPI) while public opinion bashed all lenders as more interested in huge bonus payouts than in providing credit to get business going again.