run for the hills

run for the hills

1. To move to higher ground, as in preparation for or in response to a natural disaster. There are bound to be tidal waves after an earthquake like that. We'd better run for the hills!
2. To flee hastily; to clear out or depart quickly. Uh oh, Uncle Jerome's been drinking again. Run for the hills, everyone! The staff all ran for the hills when it was announced that there would be a stock-take at the end of the shift.
See also: hill, run
References in periodicals archive ?
A welcome change from the gray water of the ending winter, but not pleasant enough to stave off the fear in children and wildlife who will turn and run for the hills with the idea that the Fermi lab had some terrible nuclear experiment go ary.
Hubbard, Frank Stronach), and none of it made its rivals for the sports and gambling dollar run for the hills.
Short sellers are beginning to run for the hills, as the number of EMC shorts dropped by 23 percent last month to 24 million.
RUN for the hills because next week the disaster zone that is John Prescott is to have his finger hovering over the nuclear button
If you see Deirdre's neck muscles tighten and her eyes go all Marty Feldman behind those bins, run for the hills.
In her ``director's statement,'' second-time director (Kandel's first feature, ``Naked Jane,'' was - run for the hills - ``acclaimed at the Sundance Film Festival'') says she wanted to make a film about ``friends who at times have led empty bourgeois lives, but don't or can't do it any longer.
Run for the hills if you see gold prices go over $400 an ounce since some bond investors will switch to the gold market as a protection against strong inflation that can erode the value of their investments.
Nor should women run for the hills just because they can see a little chrome on a man's dome.
I would have run for the hills when I was a child if stamps had carried cartoon characters on them.