run amok

run amok

 and run amuck
to go awry; to go bad; to turn bad; to go into a frenzy. (From a Malay word meaning to run wild in a violent frenzy.) Our plan ran amok. He ran amuck early in the school year and never quite got back on the track.
See also: amok, run

run amok

to act in a wild or dangerous manner There were 50 little kids running amok at the snack bar.
See also: amok, run

run amok

Also, run riot or wild . Behave in a frenzied, out-of-control, or unrestrained manner. For example, I was afraid that if I left the toddler alone she would run amok and have a hard time calming down , or The weeds are running riot in the lawn, or The children were running wild in the playground. Amok comes from a Malay word for "frenzied" and was adopted into English, and at first spelled amuck, in the second half of the 1600s. Run riot dates from the early 1500s and derives from an earlier sense, that is, a hound's following an animal scent. Run wild alludes to an animal reverting to its natural, uncultivated state; its figurative use dates from the late 1700s.
See also: amok, run

run amok

(ˈrən əˈmək)
in. to go awry. (From a Malay word meaning to run wild in a violent frenzy.) Our plan ran amok.
See also: amok, run
References in periodicals archive ?
So I wish they'd spare us the hypocrisy when madmen run amok with guns as a direct result of them running amok with fighter jets.
Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe (who's had a ghastly week) was speaking after the inquest into the death of career criminal Mark Duggan returned a verdict of lawful killing, prompting thugs to run amok through the Old Bailey and threaten jurors.
I despise the lunatics behind the human rights law, which is a licence for brainless vermin to run amok.
Though there's an occasional amusing gag about technology run amok, ``Hyperdrive'' is more droll than funny and awfully cheesy, to boot.
Unfortunately, immune cells from these new arrivals can run amok in the recipient, creating a life-threatening complication called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD).
These are not examples of a mature society but of a judiciary run amok.
We also have a Martin (Tony), MP for the NDP party, who represents himself as a Christian, when like Paul Martin he is "also" a "Catholic run amok.
Another problem blighting Liverpool is ``professional'' dog walkers who arrive at the park with up to 12 dogs at a time, let them off the lead, and allow them to run amok.
A sort of Time Warner Center run amok, the eponymous Franklin Abraham takes the concept of mixed-use development to decadent extremes, comprising apartments, offices, casinos, theme restaurants, upscale lounges, dingy demimonde salons, retail operations both licit and illicit, and a "Sky Park.
Sure, it's feasible that Coca-Cola's board acted maladroitly in tapping retiree Neville Isdell as the company's new CEO ("Directors Run Amok at Coke," Final Word, June).
The Edsel story is one everyone knows: A cautionary tale of the dangers of research run amok, questionable styling, and bad timing.
The sophisticated search for common ground reflects the reality of an increasingly integrated world economy: Countries may disagree on a specific issue, but they will meet again on others so emotions cannot be allowed to run amok.
When veterans run amok, we reflexively invoke "post-traumatic stress syndrome," which was the Vietnam war's version of shell shock.
The administration has stated that Bush won't attend, and certainly isn't going to let EPA Administrator Christine Whitman run amok with so many European environmentalists.
The new court may very well run amok, but with passage of our bill, American men and women in uniform will be protected.