rumour campaign

rumour campaign

A concentrated and prolonged effort to damage or ruin someone's or some group's reputation through the perpetuation of rumours, innuendos, and/or falsities, generally as a means of persuading a large amount of people against him, her, or them. Primarily heard in UK. Finding himself at the wrong end of a vicious rumour campaign, the local MP's slim lead heading into the election quickly evaporated. I think we need to start a rumour campaign to slow down the competitor's growth in the market, but no one can know that it's coming from us!
See also: campaign, rumour
References in periodicals archive ?
An internet rumour campaign has been rooting for Merlin and Prince Arthur to admit that they fancy each other
May I point out his distress is initiated not by any promises from them, but by the scurrilous rumour campaign waged by Labour during the run-up to the election.
The London Stock Exchange took the extraordinary step yesterday of defending its chief executive Clara Furse from what it called an 'unfounded and deeply offensive' rumour campaign.
Mrs Adams became the victim of a scurrilous rumour campaign spread by her "buddies" with preposterous tales of drinking and affairs.
AN estate agent claims her firm has been the victim of a malicious rumour campaign.
Skilful camera work coupled with a subtle rumour campaign that an actor and actress have gone all the way in their love scenes, has left cinema audiences guessing for years.