References in classic literature ?
If I were a rose of anywhere, I'd soon wilt in this stuffy little office of inky smells," she answered pleasantly.
A rose, by rights, belongs out of doors,"--Martin indicated the direction of his farm--"out there where the sun shines and there's no smells except the rich, healthy smells of nature.
If I bring her a red rose she will dance with me till dawn.
But with me she will not dance, for I have no red rose to give her"; and he flung himself down on the grass, and buried his face in his hands, and wept.
The old man rose suddenly and placed one hand on Leslie's head and one on Anne's.
Long she lay watching the bright shadows, and listening to the song of the rose, while through the long night dreams of lovely things floated like bright clouds through her mind; while the rose bent lovingly above her, and sang in the clear moonlight.
With the sun rose the Fairies, and, with Eva, hastened away to the fountain, whose cool waters were soon filled with little forms, and the air ringing with happy voices, as the Elves floated in the blue waves among the fair white lilies, or sat on the green moss, smoothing their bright locks, and wearing fresh garlands of dewy flowers.
1825, to protect the fur trade, he held a conference with the Crow nation, at which Rose figured as Indian dignitary and Crow interpreter.
The plot of Rose to rob and abandon his countrymen when in the heart of the wilderness, and to throw himself into the hands of savages, may appear strange and improbable to those unacquainted with the singular and anomalous characters that are to be found about the borders.
These hordes of villains being broken up and dispersed, Rose had betaken himself to the wilderness, and associated himself with the Crows, whose predatory habits were congenial with his own, had married a woman of the tribe, and, in short, had identified himself with those vagrant savages.
Other fellows wondered at the sudden intimacy, and Rose was asked what he saw in Philip.
Soon they grew accustomed to the two walking into chapel arm in arm or strolling round the precincts in conversation; wherever one was the other could be found also, and, as though acknowledging his proprietorship, boys who wanted Rose would leave messages with Carey.
But Ariadne Blish was the worst failure of all, for Rose could not bear the sight of her, and said she was so like a wax doll she longed to give her a pinch and see if she would squeak.
And so the lazy poet rose and followed the lady into a lovely garden.
A few--a very few--will suffice, Rose,' said the young man, drawing his chair towards her.