roost

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cock of the roost

An arrogant, conceited, or overly proud person, typically a man. He struts around campus like he's the cock of the roost, all because his dad is some politician.
See also: cock, of, roost

curses, like chickens, come home to roost

One's previous actions will eventually have consequences or cause problems. Aw man, I knew not handing in my homework would be a problem eventually. Curses, like chickens, come home to roost, after all. I'd be careful before making any rash decisions—you know that curses, like chickens, come home to roost.
See also: come, home, like, roost

chickens come home to roost

Prov. You have to face the consequences of your mistakes or bad deeds. Jill: Emily found out that I said she was incompetent, and now she won't recommend me for that job. Jane: The chickens have come home to roost, I see.
See also: chicken, come, home, roost

rule the roost

Fig. to be the boss or manager, especially at home. Who rules the roost at your house? Our new office manager really rules the roost.
See also: roost, rule

come home to roost

to cause problems for you He said some stupid things and now those remarks were coming home to roost.
Usage notes: said of problems that result from your own mistakes, and sometimes used with chickens: Nobody felt sorry for him because it was a case of the chickens coming home to roost.
Etymology: based on the habit of chickens and other birds that return to their nesting places
See also: come, home, roost

rule the roost

to be the person who makes the decisions Jimmy might be the boss at work, but at home it's his daughters who rule the roost.
See also: roost, rule

chickens come home to roost

if you say that chickens are coming home to roost, you mean that bad or silly things done in the past are beginning to cause problems There was too much greed in the past, and now the chickens are coming home to roost with crime and corruption soaring.
See Don't count chickens
See also: chicken, come, home, roost

rule the roost

to be the most powerful person who makes all the decisions in a group It was my mother who ruled the roost at home.
See also: roost, rule

chickens come home to roost

The consequences of doing wrong always catch up with the wrongdoer, as in Now that you're finally admitting your true age, no one believes you-chickens come home to roost . The fact that chickens usually come home to rest and sleep has long been known, but the idea was used figuratively only in 1809, when Robert Southey wrote, "Curses are like young chickens, they always come home to roost" ( The Curse of Kehama).
See also: chicken, come, home, roost

rule the roost

Be in charge, boss others, as in In our division the chairman's son rules the roost. This expression originated in the 15th century as rule the roast, which was either a corruption of rooster or alluded to the person who was in charge of the roast and thus ran the kitchen. In the barnyard a rooster decides which hen should roost near him. Both interpretations persisted for 200 years. Thomas Heywood (c. 1630) put it as "Her that ruled the roast in the kitchen," but Shakespeare had it in 2 Henry VI (1:1): "The new-made duke that rules the roast," which is more ambiguous. In the mid-1700s roost began to compete with roast, and in the 1900s roost displaced roast altogether. Also see run the show.
See also: roost, rule

come home to roost

To have repercussions or aftereffects, especially unfavorable ones: The consequences of your mistake will eventually come home to roost.
See also: come, home, roost

rule the roost

Informal
To be in charge; dominate: In this house my parents rule the roost.
See also: roost, rule
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the first big roost we have identified on site during the nine years of surveys.
The lesser horseshoe bat roost is in the attic of Nantclwyd y Dre.
Indeed, many people regard having a roost in their loft space as something of a privilege, and go to considerable lengths to make their small furry guests as welcome as possible.
The estimated distance from observer to bird for the nocturnal roost locations was 200-500 m because of private property restrictions.
Additionally, for palm oases with confirmed roosts, 74% showed evidence of new palm growth in the area whereas all locations in which the species was absent lacked any evidence of new growth.
w Mr Crompton rsaid the meadow o is directlr yl alongside one of the hotspots and he is nowo inven stigating whether theye roost at the site.
To monitoring the efficiency of the measures including controlling bat roosts and food sources;
DOZENS of bats are feared to have died in an arson attack on their roost.
Starling roosts can be seen at many RSPB nature reserves and other sites across Wales.
PAXTON - When they were built more than 15 years ago, the roost modules in the bat house at Moore State Park were put in to make the house a maternity colony.
Guano is increasingly collected under the roosts of bats for use in a variety of studies.
Bridges and culverts are used as roosts by many bat species throughout the United States, including species of conservation concern (LaVal 1967, Humphrey and Gore 1992, Keeley and Tuttle 1999, Trousdale and Beckett 2004).
Washington, December 18 (ANI): A new study has found that a rare bat which roosts upright clings to slick leaves by secreting a "modified sweat" into pads on its wrists and ankles.
As favoured roosts are pre-1900 stone buildings with slate roofs, North and Mid Wales are strongholds for lesser horseshoe bats, with six reserves now under VWT management in the region.
Very little data exist on use of natural tree roosts of these species.