roost

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cock of the roost

An arrogant, conceited, or overly proud person, typically a man. He struts around campus like he's the cock of the roost, all because his dad is some politician.
See also: cock, of, roost

curses, like chickens, come home to roost

One's previous actions will eventually have consequences or cause problems. Aw man, I knew not handing in my homework would be a problem eventually. Curses, like chickens, come home to roost, after all. I'd be careful before making any rash decisions—you know that curses, like chickens, come home to roost.
See also: come, home, like, roost

chickens come home to roost

Prov. You have to face the consequences of your mistakes or bad deeds. Jill: Emily found out that I said she was incompetent, and now she won't recommend me for that job. Jane: The chickens have come home to roost, I see.
See also: chicken, come, home, roost

rule the roost

Fig. to be the boss or manager, especially at home. Who rules the roost at your house? Our new office manager really rules the roost.
See also: roost, rule

come home to roost

to cause problems for you He said some stupid things and now those remarks were coming home to roost.
Usage notes: said of problems that result from your own mistakes, and sometimes used with chickens: Nobody felt sorry for him because it was a case of the chickens coming home to roost.
Etymology: based on the habit of chickens and other birds that return to their nesting places
See also: come, home, roost

rule the roost

to be the person who makes the decisions Jimmy might be the boss at work, but at home it's his daughters who rule the roost.
See also: roost, rule

chickens come home to roost

if you say that chickens are coming home to roost, you mean that bad or silly things done in the past are beginning to cause problems There was too much greed in the past, and now the chickens are coming home to roost with crime and corruption soaring.
See Don't count chickens
See also: chicken, come, home, roost

rule the roost

to be the most powerful person who makes all the decisions in a group It was my mother who ruled the roost at home.
See also: roost, rule

chickens come home to roost

The consequences of doing wrong always catch up with the wrongdoer, as in Now that you're finally admitting your true age, no one believes you-chickens come home to roost . The fact that chickens usually come home to rest and sleep has long been known, but the idea was used figuratively only in 1809, when Robert Southey wrote, "Curses are like young chickens, they always come home to roost" ( The Curse of Kehama).
See also: chicken, come, home, roost

rule the roost

Be in charge, boss others, as in In our division the chairman's son rules the roost. This expression originated in the 15th century as rule the roast, which was either a corruption of rooster or alluded to the person who was in charge of the roast and thus ran the kitchen. In the barnyard a rooster decides which hen should roost near him. Both interpretations persisted for 200 years. Thomas Heywood (c. 1630) put it as "Her that ruled the roast in the kitchen," but Shakespeare had it in 2 Henry VI (1:1): "The new-made duke that rules the roast," which is more ambiguous. In the mid-1700s roost began to compete with roast, and in the 1900s roost displaced roast altogether. Also see run the show.
See also: roost, rule

come home to roost

To have repercussions or aftereffects, especially unfavorable ones: The consequences of your mistake will eventually come home to roost.
See also: come, home, roost

rule the roost

Informal
To be in charge; dominate: In this house my parents rule the roost.
See also: roost, rule
References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, if there really are bats roosting in the house you have found, then you either have to forget it and look elsewhere, or go ahead and make the best of things.
Between 8-15 mins after sunset, we relocated the bird roosting in an agricultural area -2.
The roosting site data has been further divided according to the status of the individual site for better understanding.
xanthinus occurrence and roosting could not be confirmed through acoustic and visual affirmation on the first round of surveys, then oases were resurveyed up to two more times (for a maximum of up to three surveys at each site).
BIRD WATCH: Jonathan Lane at home with the owls' roosting in the background (AC211011Aowl-06, 01) * AN OWLING SUCCESS: The pair of tawnies roosting in the chimney of an outbuilding at the home of Jonathan Lane in New Mill Pictures by Andrew Catchpool (AC211011Aowl-05)
Kunz is looking to partner with area organizations with wood shops in hopes of constructing more bat houses with roosting modules.
These structures may be critical habitat for species that historically relied on natural roosts, and some species may be seasonally dependent on anthropogenic roosts in landscapes with limited natural roosting alternatives (Trousdale et al.
SOME SHOW: The birds twist and turn to try to evade predators and form spectacular shapes THE BIRD WINGING IT: The starlings form the shape of a bird as they search for a roosting place for the night
RISING numbers of rare and threatened bats are posing headaches for building developers as they commandeer ever more roosting sites.
ROOSTING HABITS OF TWO SPECIES OF BATS IN WESTERN TENNESSEE.
The creatures have been roosting in council properties earmarked for demolition in Adkinson Avenue, Dunchurch.
Creedon today announced that the commonwealth will again work to expel roosting crows in and around the Capitol Complex between 5 p.
For birds in particular, the roof provides a great shelter, roosting area, and nesting spot.
Enhanced with Susan Guevara's graceful and lively illustrations, Isabel's House Of Butterflies by Tony Johnston tells the story of a young girl who enjoys the sight of thousands of butterflies roosting in her favorite tree.