roost

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cock of the roost

An arrogant, conceited, or overly proud person, typically a man. He struts around campus like he's the cock of the roost, all because his dad is some politician.
See also: cock, of, roost

curses, like chickens, come home to roost

One's previous actions will eventually have consequences or cause problems. Aw man, I knew not handing in my homework would be a problem eventually. Curses, like chickens, come home to roost, after all. I'd be careful before making any rash decisions—you know that curses, like chickens, come home to roost.
See also: come, home, like, roost

chickens come home to roost

Prov. You have to face the consequences of your mistakes or bad deeds. Jill: Emily found out that I said she was incompetent, and now she won't recommend me for that job. Jane: The chickens have come home to roost, I see.
See also: chicken, come, home, roost

rule the roost

Fig. to be the boss or manager, especially at home. Who rules the roost at your house? Our new office manager really rules the roost.
See also: roost, rule

come home to roost

to cause problems for you He said some stupid things and now those remarks were coming home to roost.
Usage notes: said of problems that result from your own mistakes, and sometimes used with chickens: Nobody felt sorry for him because it was a case of the chickens coming home to roost.
Etymology: based on the habit of chickens and other birds that return to their nesting places
See also: come, home, roost

rule the roost

to be the person who makes the decisions Jimmy might be the boss at work, but at home it's his daughters who rule the roost.
See also: roost, rule

chickens come home to roost

if you say that chickens are coming home to roost, you mean that bad or silly things done in the past are beginning to cause problems There was too much greed in the past, and now the chickens are coming home to roost with crime and corruption soaring.
See Don't count chickens
See also: chicken, come, home, roost

rule the roost

to be the most powerful person who makes all the decisions in a group It was my mother who ruled the roost at home.
See also: roost, rule

chickens come home to roost

The consequences of doing wrong always catch up with the wrongdoer, as in Now that you're finally admitting your true age, no one believes you-chickens come home to roost . The fact that chickens usually come home to rest and sleep has long been known, but the idea was used figuratively only in 1809, when Robert Southey wrote, "Curses are like young chickens, they always come home to roost" ( The Curse of Kehama).
See also: chicken, come, home, roost

rule the roost

Be in charge, boss others, as in In our division the chairman's son rules the roost. This expression originated in the 15th century as rule the roast, which was either a corruption of rooster or alluded to the person who was in charge of the roast and thus ran the kitchen. In the barnyard a rooster decides which hen should roost near him. Both interpretations persisted for 200 years. Thomas Heywood (c. 1630) put it as "Her that ruled the roast in the kitchen," but Shakespeare had it in 2 Henry VI (1:1): "The new-made duke that rules the roast," which is more ambiguous. In the mid-1700s roost began to compete with roast, and in the 1900s roost displaced roast altogether. Also see run the show.
See also: roost, rule

come home to roost

To have repercussions or aftereffects, especially unfavorable ones: The consequences of your mistake will eventually come home to roost.
See also: come, home, roost

rule the roost

Informal
To be in charge; dominate: In this house my parents rule the roost.
See also: roost, rule
References in periodicals archive ?
If I'm near roosted birds in the morning, a few tree calls lets them know a strange hen is close and wants to join the flock.
Bats roosted in three areas of a garage, which included a crevice above an opened window pane on the western wall facing Cedar Street (A), a crevice above an opened window pane of the southern wall facing an alley (B), and a crevice spanning the entire length of the enclosed eastern wall of the parking garage facing west (C).
1), but most birds (n = 26) roosted in different locations when tracked on multiple nights (average distance from previous roost site = 34 [+ or -] 4 m).
Again we tried calling the roosted gobblers to us, and again the hens pulled them away from us.
Azimuths were recorded every 69 minutes (depending on the number of other bats being concurrently tracked), and tracking continued until the bat roosted.
Compared to warmer months, relatively few individuals roosted in bridges November-March, with the fewest in January and February (Table 3).
First, many vultures that roosted nearby searched for carrion in the surrounding landscape rather than for food refuse at the landfill, suggesting that food was limited at the landfill.
The earliest female to remain at the study site, radio-tagged on 3 May 2000, roosted singly during the entire observation period (4-9 May).
If possible, I like to set up the day before to avoid alerting roosted birds.
Schemnitz and Zeedyk (1982) and York (1991) noted that Gould's turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo mexicana) roosted in the largest and tallest trees in Mexico and New Mexico.
We were unable to visually locate any roosting sites (except when birds roosted in their nest boxes) because consistent radio signals often were not detectable during nighttime hours (evidence that a bird had settled into a roost site).
Bats were captured for banding using a framed wire bat trap (Tuttle 1974) or by hand as they roosted and were fitted with orange plastic forearm bands.
When bats in Whitney Barn roosted in the loft and lower level, we took samples of guano and measurements of temperature at both locations.
Occasionally we made nighttime visits with flashlights to confirm where birds roosted (the birds were slightly wary, but very tolerant, of this activity).
The first egg was deposited in the nest shortly after sunrise on 20 March and, on this date, the pair again roosted together.