roof

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Related to roofed: roof peak

snow on the roof

Silver, grey, or white hair on one's head, as due to aging. Sure, there's a bit of snow on the roof, but I still lead as adventurous a life as I ever have!
See also: on, roof, snow

roof over (one's) head

A home in which to live or rest; basic shelter. Every night, you should be grateful that you have a roof over your head and food on the table.
See also: head, roof

*busy as a beaver (building a new dam)

 and *busy as a bee; *busy as a one-armed paperhanger; *busy as Grand Central Station; *busy as a cat on a hot tin roof; *busy as a fish peddler in Lent; *busy as a cranberry merchant (at Thanksgiving); *busy as popcorn on a skillet
very busy. (*Also: as ~.) My boss keeps me as busy as a one-armed paperhanger. I don't have time to talk to you. I'm as busy as a beaver. When the tourist season starts, this store is busy as Grand Central Station. Sorry I can't go to lunch with you. I'm as busy as a beaver building a new dam. Prying into other folks' business kept him busy as popcorn on a skillet.
See also: beaver, busy

go through the roof

 
1. Fig. Inf. to become very angry. She saw what had happened and went through the roof. My father went through the roof when he saw what I did to the car.
2. Fig. Inf. [for prices] to become very high. These days, prices for gasoline are going through the roof. The cost of coffee is going through the roof.
See also: roof

hit the ceiling

 and hit the roof
Fig. to get very angry. She really hit the ceiling when she found out what happened. My dad'll hit the roof when he finds out that I wrecked his car.
See also: ceiling, hit

*keyed up (about something)

 and *keyed up (over something)
to be excited or anxious. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) Why are you so keyed up about nothing? She is keyed up over her son's health.
See also: key, up

live under the same roof (with someone)

Fig. to share a dwelling with someone. (Implies living in a close relationships, as a husband and wife.) I don't think I can go on living under the same roof with her. She was quite happy to live under the same roof with him.
See also: live, roof, same

roof something over

to build a roof over something; to provide something with a roof. After the destructive storm they had to roof the shed over so that the cow would have some shelter. We will roof over the patio and turn the area into a porch.
See also: roof

hit the ceiling

See: hit the roof
See also: ceiling, hit

keyed up

nervous or excited The interview went well today but now I'm too keyed up to sleep.
See also: key, up

a roof over your head

a place to live At least we have a roof over our heads and the children have something to eat.
See also: head, roof

go through the roof

to increase to a very high level The price of that new stock went through the roof. Police say the crime rate in our area has gone through the roof.
Usage notes: often used to refer to prices or costs
See also: roof

hit the roof

also go through the roof
to suddenly become very angry hit the ceiling I'm afraid he'll hit the roof when he finds out our vacation is canceled. Officials went through the roof when a local newspaper published the report.
See also: hit, roof

raise the roof

1. to show great enthusiasm The whole college is ready to raise the roof at next weekend's homecoming celebrations.
2. to complain loudly He didn't care if his boss raised the roof or even threatened to fire him, he knew he was right.
See also: raise, roof

be like a cat on a hot tin roof

to be nervous and unable to keep still What's the matter with her? She's like a cat on a hot tin roof this morning.
See also: cat, hot, like, on, roof, tin

hit the ceiling/roof

  (informal)
to become very angry and start shouting If I'm late again he'll hit the roof.
See also: ceiling, hit

raise the roof

to make a loud noise by shouting, clapping or singing They finished the set with their current hit and the audience raised the roof.
See also: raise, roof

a roof over your head

somewhere to live We didn't have any money, but at least we had a roof over our heads and food in our stomachs.
See also: head, roof

go through the roof

if the level of something, especially a price, goes through the roof, it increases very quickly As a result of the war, oil prices have gone through the roof.
See also: roof

the roof caves/falls in

  (American)
if the roof caves in, something very bad suddenly happens to you For the first six years of my life I was happy. Then my father died and the roof caved in.
See hit the ceiling, raise the roof
See also: cave, roof

busy as a beaver

Also, busy as a bee. Hardworking, very industrious, as in With all her activities, Sue is always busy as a bee, or Bob's busy as a beaver trying to finish painting before it rains. The comparison to beavers dates from the late 1700s, the variant from the late 1300s. Also see eager beaver; work like a beaver.
See also: beaver, busy

go through the roof

1. Also, hit the ceiling or roof . Lose one's temper, become very angry, as in Marge went through the roof when she heard she'd been fired. [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]
2. Reach new or unexpected heights, as in After the war, food prices went through the roof. [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]
See also: roof

hit the ceiling

Also, hit the roof. Explode in anger, as in Jane hit the ceiling when she saw her grades, or Dad hit the roof when he didn't get his usual bonus. The first expression dates from the early 1900s; the second is a version of a 16th-century locution, up in the house roof or house-top, meaning "enraged."
See also: ceiling, hit

like a cat on hot bricks

Also, like a cat on a hot tin roof. Restless or skittish, unable to remain still, as in Nervous about the lecture he had to give, David was like a cat on hot bricks. The first expression replaced a still earlier one, like a cat on a hot bake-stone, which appeared in John Ray's Proverbs (1678). The second was popularized as the title of Tennessee Williams's play, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955).
See also: brick, cat, hot, like, on

raise the roof

1. Be extremely noisy and boisterous, as in They'd had a lot to drink and were really raising the roof last night.
2. Complain loudly and angrily, as in When the landlord increased the rent, the tenants raised the roof about his lack of repairs and maintenance . Both usages convey the image of the roof being lifted because it cannot contain either noise or rage. [Slang; mid-1800s] Also see hit the ceiling.
See also: raise, roof

roof over one's head, a

A shelter, especially a home, as in I can barely afford to put a roof over my head, my salary is so low.
See also: roof

have snow on the roof

phr. to have white or much gray hair. Come on, judge, you’ve had hair on the roof for years!
See also: have, on, roof, snow

hit the ceiling

and hit the roof
tv. to get very angry. She really hit the ceiling when she found out what happened.
See also: ceiling, hit

hit the roof

verb
See also: hit, roof

keyed (up)

1. mod. nervous; anxious. Sally was a little keyed up before the meet.
2. and keyed up to the roof mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. He was a mite keyed, but still technically sober. Tipsy, hell! I’d say keyed up to the roof!
See also: key, up

keyed up to the roof

verb
See also: key, roof, up

go through the roof

Slang
1. To grow, intensify, or rise to an enormous, often unexpected degree: Operating costs went through the roof last year.
2. To become extremely angry: When I told her about breaking the window, she went through the roof.
See also: roof

raise the roof

Slang
1. To be extremely noisy and boisterous: They raised the roof at the party.
2. To complain loudly and bitterly: Angry tenants finally raised the roof about their noisy neighbors.
See also: raise, roof

cat on a hot tin roof

A Southernism that meant someone who was on edge or nervous. The phrase survives as the title of Tennessee Williams's 1955 Pulitzer Prize–winning drama.
See also: cat, hot, on, roof, tin
References in classic literature ?
Now and then we passed a moorland cottage, walled and roofed with stone, with no creeper to break its harsh outline.
Nestled in a deep valley lay a city of Martian concrete, whose every street and plaza and open space was roofed with glass.
It must be stated, in honor of the good sense of the loungers of Paris, that the greater part of this crowd directed their steps towards the bonfire, which was quite in season, or towards the mystery play, which was to be presented in the grand hall of the Palais de Justice (the courts of law), which was well roofed and walled; and that the curious left the poor, scantily flowered maypole to shiver all alone beneath the sky of January, in the cemetery of the Chapel of Braque.
At first the steps of a few belated villagers, or the sound of voices from the village, lightened our vigil, but one by one these interruptions died away, and an absolute stillness fell upon us, save for the chimes of the distant church, which told us of the progress of the night, and for the rustle and whisper of a fine rain falling amid the foliage which roofed us in.
By night the cows were herded in an outer inclosure roofed against the onslaughts of the carnivorous cats; and the dogs, with the exception of a few, were brought into the village; these few well-tested brutes remained with the herd.
I began to occupy my house on the 4th of July, as soon as it was boarded and roofed, for the boards were carefully feather-edged and lapped, so that it was perfectly impervious to rain, but before boarding I laid the foundation of a chimney at one end, bringing two cartloads of stones up the hill from the pond in my arms.