roll in


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roll in

Fig. to come in large numbers or amounts, easily, as if rolling. (Alludes to the arrival of many wheeled conveyances.) We didn't expect many people at the party, but they just kept rolling in. Money is simply rolling in for our charity.
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roll in something

 
1. Lit. to rotate about in something. What is that dog rolling in? We had fun rolling in the leaves.
2. Fig. to have lots of something, such as money—enough to roll in. She is just rolling in cash. Mary is rolling in money because she won the lottery.
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roll in (to some place)

to arrive at a place; to come into some place. The two cars rolled into the parking lot at about the same time. What time did they roll in?
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roll someone or something (up) in something

to turn or wrap someone or something so as to contain someone or something in something. Roll this painting up in a sheet of heavy wrapping paper. They rolled the burning man up in a blanket to put out the flames.
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roll something in

to bring something in by rotating it like a wheel or a ball or by moving it on wheels. She put the round table on its edge and rolled it in. Then she went out and got the chairs before the rain started. The waiters rolled in the table with the wedding cake on it.
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roll something in something

to turn something over and over in something, as if to coat the thing being rolled. Tony rolled each of the meatballs in flour and popped them into the hot oil. Roll each of these cookies in powdered sugar.
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roll in

to arrive or appear in large amounts or in a continuous flow Fog rolled in along the coast. Bitter winter weather is rolling in over much of the eastern United States this week. He was certain that hard work would keep the money rolling in.
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roll in

1. Retire for the night, as in It's time to roll in-we'll see you in the morning.
2. Add, as in She tried to roll in several new clauses, but the publisher would not agree.
3. Arrive, flow, or pour in, as in The football fans have been rolling in since this morning.
4. Enjoy ample amounts of, especially of wealth, as in Ask the Newmans for a donation-they're rolling in money. This idiom alludes to having so much of something that one can roll around in it (as a pig might roll in mud). It is sometimes put as rolling in it, the it meaning money. [Late 1700s] Also see roll in the aisles; roll in the hay.
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roll in

1. in. to pull in; to drive up; to arrive. The car rolled into the parking lot at a high speed.
2. Go to turn in.
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roll in

verb
See also: roll