rocks


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rock

1. noun, slang A precious gem, especially a diamond. A: "Did you see that rock on her finger?" B: "Yeah, I didn't know she was engaged!" The rocks in that necklace are worth nearly a million dollars.
2. noun Rock music, a genre of music characterized by the use of the electric guitar and bass. A shortened form of "rock and roll," from which it originated. I was into rock when I was in high school, but now I'm more into electronic music. The bar always blasts rock at such a high volume that I can never hear what anyone is saying.
3. noun, slang An ice cube. Typically used in the plural. I'd like a whiskey on the rocks, please.
4. noun, vulgar slang A testicle. Almost always used figuratively to mean confidence, courage, bravado, etc. Exclusively used in the plural. You've got some rocks on you to stand up to the boss like that, kid.
5. noun, slang A piece of crack cocaine. Typically used in the plural. Denny got caught selling rocks and got hit with a mandatory minimum.
6. adjective Pertaining to rock music. This is my favorite rock station on the radio. The band surprised its fans when it announced that its next album would be a rock opera.
7. verb To perform rock music, especially skillfully or with great energy and enthusiasm. My days of going on stage to rock are behind me at this point. Don't worry about the audience. Just go out there and rock.
8. verb To dance or move along to rock music or a similar genre. This song really gets me rocking!
9. verb, slang To be excellent or awesome. You got me my favorite doughnut! You rock! I can't believe you didn't like that movie! It rocked! Wow, you got into your dream school! That rocks!

rocks

1. n. ice cubes. Can I have a few rocks in my drink, please?
2. n. Xerox Inc. (Securities markets, New York Stock Exchange.) When she says, “Buy me a thousand rocks at the market,” that means she wants one thousand shares of Xerox at whatever the market price is at the moment.
3. n. money; a dollar. (Underworld.) Twenty rocks for that?
4. n. the testicles. (see also stones. Usually objectionable.) I was afraid I’d get kicked in the rocks, so I stayed back.
See also: rock
References in classic literature ?
Why, that crack in the rock, just facing you," replied Billina, whose little round eyes were very sharp and seemed to see everything.
look into the water above, just where it breaks over the rocks.
Mohegan pointed toward Elizabeth, who, forgetting her danger, had sunk back to a projection of the rock as soon as she recognized the sounds of Edwards’ voice, and said with something like awakened animation:
Long ere they could gain the level ground, the Spaniards, seeing them riding swiftly amid the rocks, and being ignorant of their numbers, drew off from the captured hill, and, having secured their few prisoners, rode slowly in a long column, with drum-beating and cymbal-clashing, out of the valley.
Again and again I tried to reach it, until at length, maddened with the thought of my situation, I swayed myself violently by striking my foot against the side of the rock, and at the instant that I approached the large root caught desperately at it, and transferred myself to it.
replied the voice, and there stepped from behind the rock the strangest man the travelers had ever seen.
Toto had disappeared from view, but they could hear him barking furiously among the heaps of grey rock ahead of them.
No one had the slightest suspicion; and when next day, taking a fowling-piece, powder, and shot, Dantes declared his intention to go and kill some of the wild goats that were seen springing from rock to rock, his wish was construed into a love of sport, or a desire for solitude.
which had soon grown to be a disgust), and saved me from the sense of horror I had whenever I was quite alone with dead rocks, and fowls, and the rain, and the cold sea.
Scarcely had he pronounced these words, when the impulse of the fall augmented the weight; the enormous rock sank down, pressed by those others which sank in from the sides, and, as it were, swallowed up Porthos in a sepulcher of badly jointed stones.
You will find the other rock lie lower, but they are so close together that there is not more than a bow-shot between them.
Graspus), which inhabits the crevices of the rock, stole the fish from the side of the nest, as soon as we had disturbed the parent birds.
One of these precipices, or cliffs, is curiously worn by time and weather so as to have the appearance of a ruined fortress, with towers and battlements, beetling high above the river, while two small cascades, one hundred and fifty feet in height, pitch down from the fissures of the rocks.
He was in a light skiff, and being well acquainted with the currents and eddies, had shifted his station, according to the shifting of the tide, from the Hen and Chickens to the Hog's Back, from the Hog's Back to the Pot, and from the Pot to the Frying Pan; but in the eagerness of his sport he did not see that the tide was rapidly ebbing, until the roaring of the whirlpools and eddies warned him of his danger, and he had some difficulty in shooting his skiff from among the rocks and breakers, and getting to the point of Blackwell's Island.
The trees themselves had been transferred, however, to the summit and crags of the neighbouring rocks.