rob

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Related to robbing: Robbing Peter to pay Paul
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rob the till

To steal the earnings of a shop or restaurant from out of its cash register. Just remember, this place has insurance, so if anyone comes in with a gun looking to rob the till, you don't offer up any resistance, OK? I hear Janet was fired from her last job for robbing the till.
See also: rob, till

rob Peter to pay Paul

To borrow or take money from one person or source to fund or repay the debt of another. Mr. Hardy's law firm has fallen into arrears of late, and he's been robbing Peter to pay Paul just to keep the business afloat. Never use a credit card to pay a debt—that's just robbing Peter to pay Paul!
See also: Paul, pay, peter, rob

be robbing Peter to pay Paul

To be borrowing or taking money from one person or source to fund or repay the debt of another. Mr. Hardy's law firm has fallen into arrears of late, and he's been robbing Peter to pay Paul just to keep the business afloat. Never use a credit card to pay a debt—that's just robbing Peter to pay Paul!
See also: Paul, pay, peter, rob

cradle-snatching

The act of being romantically involved with a much younger person. Primarily heard in UK. He must be cradle-snatching—how else can you explain him dating a woman 25 years younger than him?

rob (one) blind

To steal everything someone owns, especially through deceitful or fraudulent means. Sometimes used to insinuate that someone is charging too much money for something. The CEO was sent to prison for robbing his clients blind through a complex Ponzi scheme. Another $100 in fees? These guys are robbing us blind!
See also: blind, rob

rob (someone or something) of (something)

1. To steal something from someone or something. He installed a computer virus that robs the company of tiny amounts of money every single time a bank transaction is carried out. The mugger robbed me of my passport and all my cash, but thankfully he ran off before he got my phone.
2. To deprive something from someone or something. He really robbed me of my dignity with the way he chastised me in front of everyone. The trees' leaves have become so large and numerous that they are actually robbing the vegetation on the jungle floor of precious sunlight.
See also: of, rob

rob the cradle

To date someone who is much younger than oneself. Are you sure it doesn't bother you how much older I am? I feel like people are judging me for robbing the cradle.
See also: cradle, rob

rob Peter to pay Paul

Fig. to take or borrow from one in order to give or pay something owed to another. Why borrow money to pay your bills? That's just robbing Peter to pay Paul. There's no point in robbing Peter to pay Paul. You will still be in debt.
See also: Paul, pay, peter, rob

rob someone blind

 
1. Fig. to steal freely from someone. Her maid was robbing her blind. I don't want them to rob me blind. Keep an eye on them.
2. Fig. to overcharge someone. You are trying to rob me blind. I won't pay it! Those auto repair shops can rob you blind if you don't watch out.
See also: blind, rob

rob someone of something

to deprive someone of something, not necessarily by theft. What you have done has robbed me of my dignity! If you do that, you will rob yourself of your future.
See also: of, rob

rob the cradle

Fig. to marry or date someone who is much younger than oneself. I hear that Bill is dating Ann. Isn't that sort of robbing the cradle? She's much younger than he is. Uncle Billwho is nearly eightymarried a thirty-year-old woman. That is really robbing the cradle.
See also: cradle, rob

hand in the till, with one's

Also, with one's fingers in the till; have one's hand in the cookie jar. Stealing from one's employer. For example, He was caught with his hand in the till and was fired immediately, or They suspected she had her hand in the cookie jar but were waiting for more evidence. The noun till has been used for a money box or drawer since the 15th century; cookie jar, perhaps alluding to the "sweets" of money, dates only from about 1940.
See also: hand

rob Peter to pay Paul

Take from one to give to another, shift resources. For example, They took out a second mortgage on their house so they could buy a condo in Florida-they're robbing Peter to pay Paul . Although legend has it that this expression alludes to appropriating the estates of St. Peter's Church, in Westminster, London, to pay for the repairs of St. Paul's Cathedral in the 1800s, the saying first appeared in a work by John Wycliffe about 1382.
See also: Paul, pay, peter, rob

rob someone blind

Cheat someone in an unusually deceitful or thorough fashion, as in The nurse was robbing the old couple blind. This idiom may allude to robbing a blind beggar, who cannot see that the cup collecting donations is being emptied. [Mid-1900s]
See also: blind, rob, someone

rob the cradle

Have a romantic or sexual relationship with someone much younger than oneself, as in The old editor was notorious for robbing the cradle, always trying to date some young reporter . [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]
See also: cradle, rob

steal someone blind

Also, rob someone blind. Rob or cheat someone mercilessly, as in Ann always maintained that children would steal their parents blind. The allusion here is unclear. Possibly it means stealing everything, including someone's sight. [Mid-1900s]
See also: blind, someone, steal

we wuz robbed

Also, we was robbed or we were robbed. We were cheated out of a victory; we were tricked or outsmarted. For example, That ball was inside the lines-we wuz robbed! This expression, with its attempt to render nonstandard speech, has been attributed to fight manager Joe Jacobs (1896-1940), who uttered it on June 21, 1932, after his client, Max Schmeling, had clearly out-boxed Jack Sharkey, only to have the heavy-weight title awarded to Sharkey. It is still used, most often in a sports context.
See also: rob, we

cradle-snatching

BRITISH or

robbing the cradle

AMERICAN
Cradle-snatching is the practice of having a sexual relationship with a much younger partner. The woman is even older than his mother. It's cradle snatching! There'll always be those who accuse you of robbing the cradle. Note: You can describe someone who does this in British English as a cradle snatcher or, in American English, as a cradle robber. The ageing actress is a cradle snatcher, says her toyboy's family. Women who make off with men 15 to 30 years younger are viewed as neurotic cradle robbers. Note: These expressions are usually used in a disapproving way.

be robbing Peter to pay Paul

If someone is robbing Peter to pay Paul, they are using money that is meant for one thing to pay for something else. I have not starved yet but I am very conscious of failing to pay back debts, of robbing Peter to pay Paul.
See also: Paul, pay, peter, rob

rob Peter to pay Paul

take something away from one person to pay another, leaving the former at a disadvantage; discharge one debt only to incur another.
This expression probably arose in reference to the saints and apostles Peter and Paul , who are often shown together as equals in Christian art and who therefore may be presumed to be equally deserving of honour and devotion. It is uncertain whether a specific allusion is intended; variants of the phrase include unclothe Peter and clothe Paul and borrow from Peter to pay Paul .
1997 New Scientist So far, NASA has been able to rob Peter to pay Paul, taking money from the shuttle and science programmes to keep the ISS on track.
See also: Paul, pay, peter, rob

rob someone blind

get a lot of money from someone by deception or extortion. informal
See also: blind, rob, someone

ˌrob somebody ˈblind

(informal) get a lot of money from somebody by deceiving them or charging them too much for something: He robbed his clients blind, taking about 25% of their profits.
See also: blind, rob, somebody

ˌrob the ˈcradle

(American English, informal) have a sexual relationship with a much younger person: She robbed the cradle when she married me. ▶ ˈcradle-rob (American English) (British English ˈcradle-snatch) verb ˈcradle-robber (American English) (British English ˈcradle-snatcher) noun: Tim, you’re such a cradle snatcher. She’s like ten years younger than you!
See also: cradle, rob

rob ˌPeter to pay ˈPaul

(saying) take money from one area and spend it in another: Government spending on education has not increased. Some areas have improved, but only as a result of robbing Peter to pay Paul.
See also: Paul, pay, peter, rob

rob of

v.
1. To deprive someone of something by stealing it: The thief robbed us of our money. I was robbed of my car.
2. To deprive something or someone of something, to injurious effect: This parasite robs trees of sap. The malicious rumor robbed me of my professional standing.
See also: of, rob

rob someone blind

1. tv. to steal freely from someone. Her maid was robbing her blind.
2. tv. to overcharge someone. Those auto repair shops can rob you blind if you don’t watch out.
See also: blind, rob, someone

rob Peter to pay Paul

To incur a debt in order to pay off another debt.
See also: Paul, pay, peter, rob

rob (someone) blind

To rob in an unusually deceitful or thorough way: robbed the old couple blind while employed as a companion.
See also: blind, rob

rob the cradle

Informal
To have a romantic or sexual relationship with someone significantly younger than oneself.
See also: cradle, rob

rob Peter to pay Paul

Use funds from one source to repay a debt. If you use one credit card to pay off another, even if you're benefiting by buying time, you're robbing Peter to pay Paul. How the phrase came to be associated with what would seem to be the two apostles is a mystery, since neither was associated with precarious financial planning.
See also: Paul, pay, peter, rob
References in periodicals archive ?
Seed mass did not differ significantly between the nectar-robbing treatments (mean [+ or -] 1 SE, low robbing = 0.
high robbing), plant nested within robbing treatment, week, and the covariate (number of open flowers) on pollen receipt in 1995 and 1996.
Nectar robbing decreased both male and female fitness components of I.
How does nectar robbing reduce the male and female reproductive success of I.
The most plausible mechanism underlying the reduction in male and female fitness components by nectar robbers is that robbing decreases the attractiveness and profitability of robbed I.
Examining the results of nectar robbing at different hierarchical levels (i.
Despite the strength of the relationship between high robbing and reduced plant fitness components, we found two apparently anomalous results, each of which can be explained in the context of the known natural history of I.
Despite these vagaries, the strength of our study lies in having taken an experimental approach and thus being able to separate the effects of robbing per se from other factors with which it may have been correlated.
Studies examining the effects of nectar robbing on both male and female reproductive success in a single plant species are rare (Wyatt 1980, Fritz and Morse 1981, Morris 1996).
aggregata prevent nectar robbing per se, but such is not the case in other nectar-robbed plant species (e.
Nectar robbing and pollination of Lantana camara (Verbenaceae).