roar

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roar at someone or something

 
1. Lit. to bellow or bawl at someone or something. Don't roar at me! Control your temper. The lion roared at the hyena, who ran off.
2. Fig. to laugh very hard at someone or something. The audience roared at the clown. The children roared at Dad's jokes.
See also: roar

roar away

to speed away, making a loud clamor. The car roared away into the night with tires screeching. The train roared away, carrying Andy to Canada.
See also: away, roar

roar something out

to bellow something out loudly. Walter roared his protest out so everyone knew how he felt. Jane roared out her criticism.
See also: out, roar

roar back

v.
To have great success after a period of weak performance; make a dramatic recovery: The tennis player lost the first set but roared back to win the match.
See also: back, roar

dull roar

n. a relatively quiet degree of noisiness. Try to keep it at a dull roar if you can.
See also: dull, roar
References in periodicals archive ?
Where's the Roarer, or was he the Strider, or what, by his shape-shifting name, is he properly called?
Backwoods Civility, or How the Ring-Tailed Roarer Became a Gentle Man for David Crockett, Charles F.
There's wee Phil Gallie, a charming man in private, a roarer and barker in public.
His intimacy with nonhuman nature can reach unsettling extremes, as when, like some ring-tailed roarer out of Southwestern humor, he singlehandedly "trees" a raccoon, dropping to his hands and knees and howling like a dog (pp.
The popular landlord also organised trips from his pub for Town away matches and the regular band of supporters were given the name, 'The Red Lion Roarers.
This innovation which articulates Aboriginal power with white objects of power, speed and travel, has a poetic resonance in the very shape of the propeller boards and the thrumming sound they make like the sacred objects called "bull- roarers.
The Fair pulls into its orbit the gulls and roarers as well as the hypocrites and the killjoys, who think that there should be no more cakes and ale.
Cats are essentially split into the purrers and the roarers.
Lord Milton can with his finger stop the foul mouths of all the Roarers against heresy" (Rae [1895] 1965, 133).