roar at

roar at someone or something

1. Lit. to bellow or bawl at someone or something. Don't roar at me! Control your temper. The lion roared at the hyena, who ran off.
2. Fig. to laugh very hard at someone or something. The audience roared at the clown. The children roared at Dad's jokes.
See also: roar
References in classic literature ?
On his departure the Farmer grievously lamented the destruction of his sheep and oxen, but his wife, who had been a spectator to all that took place, said, "On my word, you are rightly served, for how could you for a moment think of shutting up a Lion along with you in your farmyard when you know that you shake in your shoes if you only hear his roar at a distance?
They promised to make the Scottish lion roar at Westminster.
We were trying to correct a previous assumption that lions and tigers roar at low fundamental frequencies because they have a huge vocal folds," says study co-author Tobias Riede, a research assistant professor of biology at the University of Utah and a research associate at the National Center for Voice and Speech.
ROAR at Vision, Queen Street, is cranking up the tempo for its birthday party next week, when Lisa Lashes will grace the decks.